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Mighty Health created a wellness app with older adults top of mind

Mighty Health created a wellness app with older adults top of mind

Virtual classes might make it easier to work out anywhere, anytime, but not for anyone. Mainstream fitness tech often targets the young and fit, in advertisements and cardio-heavy exercises. It effectively excludes aging adults from participating. <br>This gap between mainstream fitness and elders is where Mighty Health, a Y Combinator graduate, comes in.<br>Mighty Health has created a nutrition and fitness wellness app that is tailored to older adults who might have achy hips or joint problems. Today, the San Francisco-based startup has announced it raised $2.8 million in funding by Y Combinator, NextView Ventures, RRE Ventures, Liquid2 Ventures, Soma Capital and more.<br>Founder and CEO James Li is the child of immigrants, a detail he says helped him lean into entrepreneurship. He had the idea for Mighty Health after his father was rushed to the hospital for emergency open-heart surgery.<br>“Growing up, we can often think of our parents as invincible — they look after you and take care of you, and you usually don’t worry too much about them,” Li said. His dad survived the surgery, and Li thought about the evolving health needs and limitations of folks over 50 years old. He teamed up with co-founder Dr. Bernard Chang, the youngest-ever ED doctor to receive a top-tier NIH grant and the vice chair of research at Columbia University Medical Center, to create Mighty Health.<br>Mighty Health’s product is focused on three things: live coaching; content focused on nutrition, preventative checkups and workouts; and celebrations that let family members tune into their loved ones’ achievements.<br>The app has inclusivity built into its functionality. Everyday, a user logs in and gets a set of three to five tasks to complete, distributed among nutrition, exercise and workouts. The workouts are pre-recorded videos with trainers that have focused on the over-50 population. Think indoor cardio sets focused on being kinder to joints or lower her impacts.<br>Image Credits: Mighty Health<br>One customer, Elizabeth, is a 56-year-old mother who joined Mighty Health after suffering a cardiac incident. The app got her to start walking 9,000 steps a day, lose weigh, lower cholesterol and, best of all, discover a love for a vegetable she had recently written off: brussels sprouts.<br>Mighty Health’s other core focus, beyond fitness, is nutrition. The app pairs users with a coach to help them create healthy habits around nutrition and lifestyle. The coaching is done through text message. Li says this was intentional because in the early days of Mighty Health, he saw that coaching in-app was difficult for users to navigate.<br>Image Credits: Mighty Health<br>“You have to meet them in the middle where they are,” Li said. The live coaching is also met with phone calls, although 90% of coach interactions are text-message based.<br>The nutrition program also accounts for a diverse user base. Mighty Health chose not to offer or push recipes upon members, unlike a lot of other applications, because all countries and cultures might not find generic recipes accessible.<br>“Instead, we focus on the ingredient level,” he said. “We send them ingredients that they can piece together however they like at home in the way that they cook their cultural meals.”<br>The company offers a free seven-day trail, followed by a membership fee of $20 per month. It’s also having discussions with a number of health insurers to offer Mighty Health as a benefit.<br>With the new capital, the startup hired a few engineers and a designer to build out product integrations with fitness trackers, plus add new content. For now, Li sees his father’s progress with pride.<br>“Though I’m sure he sometimes thinks I just went from nagging him directly to nagging him through my product, he’s been eating healthier and exercising nearly every day,” Li said. So far, his father has lost 25 pounds.<br><br><b>Author:Natasha Mascarenhas</b><br><b>Source:https://techcrunch.com/2020/07/13/mighty-health-created-a-wellness-app-with-older-adults-top-of-mind/</b>

Nikita Johal

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COVID patients can be overwhelmed with inflammation. Doctors are learning to calm that 'storm'

COVID patients can be overwhelmed with inflammation. Doctors are learning to calm that 'storm'

In the millions of tiny air sacs tasked with absorbing oxygen in Brett Breslow's lungs, the scene was chaos.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Some of the sacs were swollen with fluid that had leaked from surrounding blood vessels. Others had simply collapsed. The grim result: the Cherry Hill man was starved of oxygen, leading doctors at Cooper University Hospital to put him on a ventilator for 19 days.<br>Breslow was suffering from a massive bout of inflammation—a catch-all description for the damage in many of the sickest patients with COVID-19. In addition to the assault on his lungs, the disease was harming his liver and kidneys, as well as causing him to form abnormal blood clots.<br>"It really attacked every organ in the body," said his wife, Amy.<br>Physicians have known for decades how to treat inflammation. In 1950, the Nobel Prize was given to researchers who found that in people with rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation could be calmed with steroids (not the kind used illegally by some athletes, but synthetic versions of a different class of hormones). Later that year, steroids were used to treat asthma, another widespread inflammatory condition.<br>And in June, researchers reported that dexamethasone, an inexpensive, generic steroid, improved the odds of survival for COVID-19 patients on ventilators.<br>But steroids are a brute-force approach. Though inflammation can be harmful, it also is one way the immune system fights off disease. From the start of the pandemic, physicians warned that if steroids were used to tamp down the collateral damage from inflammation, patients might be less able to fight off the initial cause of the problem: the coronavirus.<br>"They are like shotguns," Anita McElroy, a University of Pittsburgh infectious-disease specialist, said of the drugs. "They dampen all the immune response."<br>A new pair of studies from the University of Pennsylvania may offer a roadmap to a more targeted response. Researchers took blood samples from dozens of COVID patients and ran them through a boxy device called a flow cytometer, using laser beams to identify which kinds of immune cells had been activated to fight the disease.<br>The authors measured each patient's B-cells, which, if properly activated, make antibodies to fight the virus. They also measured various kinds of T-cells, including "helper" cells that play a role in marshaling the body's defenses, and "killer" cells, which destroy infected cells before the virus inside them spreads further. All cells were further categorized by molecular signatures that indicated their readiness to fight disease.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>When it was all boiled down, people with COVID seemed to cluster into three broad "immunotypes," said E. John Wherry, director of Penn's Institute for Immunology. Loosely speaking, some patients' immune systems seemed to have overreacted to the virus, while others were slow to react. In a third group, the immune system did not seem to respond much at all.<br>The findings represent a first step toward identifying which patients might need to have certain inflammatory agents calmed down, and which might need other elements of the immune system dialed up, said Wherry, who led one of the studies.<br>"You might want to boost the immune system in a certain way, or you might want to take the edge off it, or shut it down a little bit," he said.<br>A key part of the puzzle might be apparent "perturbations" in what is called the innate immune system: a series of first-responder white blood cells that start fighting disease before more specialized T- and B-cells get to work, said Wherry's Penn colleague Michael R. Betts, who led the other study.<br>"We've identified that there's something going on there," Betts said. "Now we have to figure out what does it mean."<br>Elsewhere, studies already are underway for several of the more-targeted anti-inflammatory drugs—including one called tocilizumab, marketed as Actemra.<br>But long before those studies could yield results, Brett Breslow needed help.<br>A drug cocktail<br>An engineer at Lockheed Martin, Breslow felt moderately ill for more than a week in mid-March. Then, as some other COVID-19 patients have experienced, he took a sudden turn for the worse. At Cooper, the 50-year-old was put in a drug-induced coma and had a breathing tube placed down his throat to deliver more oxygen to his fluid-filled lungs.<br>Three days after he was admitted to the hospital, Breslow's various "markers" of inflammation were elevated, including his levels of ferritin, a type of molecule that stores iron. That can mean two things, said Wherry, who was not involved in his care. Viruses need iron just like the humans they infect, so Breslow's body might have been trying to sequester it from the virus. Elevated iron storage also can be a sign of tissue damage.<br>Breslow got one dose of Actemra on March 23, followed by a second dose on March 28, said his wife, who used her iPhone to take copious notes on his daily progress. To her relief, his inflammation markers started to come down. Yet he stayed on the ventilator for 12 more days.<br>Did Actemra make the difference? Since then, evidence from studies of the drug has been mixed, but some researchers have theorized that it helps only when given to the right subset of patients.<br>Breslow received other drugs as well, including hydroxychloroquine, the drug touted by President Donald Trump, and Kaletra, an antiviral drug designed to treat HIV, as his doctors reviewed early evidence from virus hotspots in Italy and China. And because he was suffering from blood clots, the hospital gave him heparin, an anticoagulant.<br>"Basically, they were learning as they went," Amy Breslow said.<br>Some physicians have characterized the inflammatory state of severe COVID patients as being triggered by a "storm" of cytokines: a class of small proteins that serve as alarm signals for the immune system. But others have rejected that term, as overall cytokine levels are not that high in many severe patients.<br>Instead, the culprit could be a modest elevation in certain flavors of cytokines, said Wherry, a professor at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine. Actemra blocks just one type of cytokine, called interleukin-6.<br>Striking a balance<br>As the research on targeted therapies continues, the broader approach of steroids remains part of the plan for many COVID patients.<br>At Temple University Hospital, steroids have helped hundreds of severely ill COVID patients recover, said pulmonologist Sameep Sehgal.<br>When used judiciously, for a short period at a moderate dose, steroids can keep inflammation in check without suppressing the immune system to the degree that patients cannot fight off infection, he said.<br>"It's a balancing act," Sehgal said. "The more practical question is, does this help save lives, and get patients out of the hospital quicker?"<br>Though Breslow did not get steroids to calm down his inflamed lungs in the hospital, doctors prescribed them to him later to improve function in another organ: his kidneys.<br>His kidneys started to fail while at Cooper, prompting physicians to place him on dialysis. He continued with the filtering treatments afterward, at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia.<br>But his levels of creatinine, a waste product that the kidneys are supposed to remove, remained high, and doctors started talking about a transplant. As a last-ditch measure, one physician suggested that he try taking the steroid prednisone. Within a day or two, his kidney function improved.<br>Breslow has been home in Cherry Hill since May 27, yet is still not back to normal.<br>"It's a long road back," he said.<br>At first, he could barely get up the stairs. A week ago, his lungs looked normal on a chest X-ray. But he still tires easily, and will undergo another test of his lung function on Monday.<br>While the all-out, inflammatory assault of COVID-19 is Breslow's past, its aftereffects remain.<br> <br><br><b>Author:Tom Avril, The Philadelphia Inquirer</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-covid-patients-overwhelmed-inflammation-doctors.html</b>

RIA RATH

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Adherence to prophylaxis for EGFRi-linked rash beneficial

Adherence to prophylaxis for EGFRi-linked rash beneficial

(HealthDay)—Increasing adherence to evidence-based prophylaxis protocols for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (EGFRi)-associated rash can reduce interventions and toxicity-associated chemotherapy interruptions, according to a study published online July 1 in JAMA Dermatology.<br> <br><br><br><br><br>Zizi Yu, from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues examined the impact of adherence to prophylaxis guidelines for prevention of EGFRi-associated cutaneous toxic effects. Data were included for 118 patients treated with cetuximab in 2012 (two years after publication of the Skin Toxicity Evaluation Protocol With Panitumumab) and 90 treated with cetuximab in 2017 (two years after full implementation of the Skin Toxicities from Anticancer Therapies program).<br>The researchers found that 25 percent of patients treated in 2012 and 47 percent treated in 2017 were prophylactically treated for skin toxicity at cetuximab initiation. From 2012 to 2017, there were increases noted in preemptive tetracycline use (45 to 71 percent) and topical corticosteroid use (7 to 57 percent), while use of topical antibiotics decreased (79 to 43 percent). The incidence of rash did not differ by prophylaxis status. Compared with those not prescribed prophylactic treatment, patients prescribed prophylactic treatment were less likely to require a first or second rescue treatment for rash (adjusted odds ratios, 0.06 and 0.26, respectively) or to experience a cetuximab dose change or interruption (adjusted odds ratio, 0.21).<br>"The results of this study highlight the value of integrating dermatologic care and education into oncology centers," the authors write.<br>Two authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-adherence-prophylaxis-egfri-linked-rash-beneficial.html</b>

RAMDENI YADAV

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Staphylococcus aureus virulence tied to atopic dermatitis in infants

Staphylococcus aureus virulence tied to atopic dermatitis in infants

(HealthDay)—Skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is associated with the risk for developing atopic dermatitis (AD), and infants who do not develop AD primarily exhibit acquisition of dysfunctional mutations in the S. aureus quorum-sensing system, according to a study published in the July 8 issue of Science Translational Medicine.<br> <br><br><br><br><br>Yuumi Nakamura, M.D., Ph.D., from the Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan, and colleagues performed whole-genome sequencing of S. aureus strains isolated from the cheek skin of 268 Japanese infants at 1 to 6 months old to examine the role in AD development.<br>The researchers found that regardless of AD outcome, about 45 percent of infants were colonized with S. aureus at 1 month. At 6 months of age, skin colonization with S. aureus was associated with an increased risk for developing AD. Strains from 6-month-old infants who did not develop AD primarily exhibited acquisition of dysfunctional mutations in the S. aureus Agr quorum-sensing system. In mice, expression of a functional Agr system in S. aureus was necessary for epidermal colonization and AD-like inflammation induction.<br>"These studies show that retention of agr virulence is associated with increased S. aureus skin colonization and development of AD in Japanese infants," the authors write.<br>One author disclosed financial ties to Boehringer Ingelheim.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-staphylococcus-aureus-virulence-tied-atopic.html</b>

Vinay Pandey

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Policy guides medical marijuana use at pediatric hospital

Policy guides medical marijuana use at pediatric hospital

(HealthDay)—Development of institutional policy and clinical support services is beneficial for pediatric hospitals interested in use of medical marijuana (MMJ), according to a special article published online July 13 in Pediatrics.<br> <br><br><br><br><br>Noting that Colorado was one of the first states to legalize MMJ, Amy E. Carver, Pharm.D., from the Children's Hospital Colorado in Aurora, and colleagues report on data from the first 50 patients seen at the Children's Hospital of Colorado, which created and evolved its MMJ inpatient use policy and developed a unique consultative service composed of a clinical pharmacist and social worker. The service supports patients and families and primary clinical services in situations in which MMJ is being used or actively considered.<br>The researchers found that 80 percent of the patients had an oncologic diagnosis. Nausea and vomiting, appetite simulation, seizures, and pain were symptoms to be ameliorated by active or potential MMJ use. MMJ use was determined to be potentially unsafe in 64 percent of patients, mainly due to drug-drug interactions. A recommendation was made to avoid MMJ use or adjust its administration schedule in 68 percent of patients.<br>"Creation of a consultative service to advise front-line clinical teams on MMJ use has proven to be a beneficial strategy for consolidation of expertise on this topic at our hospital," the authors write.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-policy-medical-marijuana-pediatric-hospital.html</b>

Ankit Tiwari

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COVID-19-related symptoms persist after recovery

COVID-19-related symptoms persist after recovery

(HealthDay)—Most patients who have recovered from COVID-19 report persistence of at least one symptom, according to a research letter published online July 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.<br> <br><br><br><br><br>Angelo Carfi, M.D., from Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS in Rome, and colleagues followed up on patients who met World Health Organization criteria for discontinuation of quarantine beginning April 21, 2020. Data were collected on all clinical characteristics, including clinical and pharmacological history, lifestyle factors, vaccination status, and body measurements.<br>Data were included for 143 patients, with a mean age of 56.5 years. The researchers found that 72.7 percent of participants had evidence of interstitial pneumonia during hospitalization. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.5 days; 15 and 5 percent of patients received noninvasive and invasive ventilation, respectively. At the time of evaluation (mean of 60.3 days after onset of the first COVID-19 symptom), only 12.6 percent of patients were completely free of any COVID-19-related symptom; 32 and 55 percent had one or two and three or more symptoms, respectively. No patients had fever or symptoms of acute illness. Among 44.1 percent of patients, worsened quality of life was observed. Overall, 53.1, 43.4, 27.3, and 21.7 percent of patients reported fatigue, dyspnea, joint pain, and chest pain, respectively.<br>"Clinicians and researchers have focused on the acute phase of COVID-19, but continued monitoring after discharge for long-lasting effects is needed," the authors write.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-covid-related-symptoms-persist-recovery.html</b>

Maria Omama

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Long-studied protein could be a measure of traumatic brain injury

Long-studied protein could be a measure of traumatic brain injury

Scientists at the Walter Reed Army Institute for Research (WRAIR) have recently demonstrated that cathepsin B, a well-studied protein important to brain development and function, can be used as biomarker, or indicator of severity, for traumatic brain injury.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Traumatic brain injury (TBI) or brain trauma results from blows to the head, leading to life-changing disruption of the brain and a cascade of long-term health conditions. A leading cause of disability and death worldwide, TBI may occur due to an open-skull injury, like a gunshot wound, a fall, or an automobile accident. Athletes, the elderly, children, and military service members are particularly vulnerable.<br>Biomarkers are a source of great interest to researchers due to their potential to dramatically improve both the diagnosis and categorization of severity of TBI. Furthermore, they have the potential to validate treatment strategies by indicating whether drugs have reached their proposed targets and achieved therapeutic benefits.<br>In their publication in the Journal of Neurotrauma, the researchers showed that levels of cathepsin B were increased in areas of the injured brain relevant to controlling the senses, language, memory and other critical executive functions. In healthy cells, cathepsin B has a range of roles, including helping to eliminate damaged cells, maintaining metabolic homeostasis, and degrading improperly produced proteins. When the level of cathepsin B is not tightly controlled, it is linked to inflammation and tissue death. This publication reports the first results demonstrating the ability to use cathepsin B as a blood-based biomarker to capable of identifying TBI severity within different brain regions as well as cerebral spinal fluid.<br>"Biomarker tests that accurately reflect the extent and severity of injury can dramatically improve the standard of care, minimizing the need for resource-intensive diagnostics like CT or MRI scans in favor of more portable tests," said Dr. Angela Boutte, lead author and section chief of molecular biology and proteomics within the Brain Trauma Neuroprotection Branch at WRAIR. "This would allow for early, accurate detection of TBI, whether at the side of the road after an accident or, most importantly, on the battlefield to help guide medical decisions."<br>Future research is planned to further characterize the role of cathepsin B in TBI.<br> <br><br><b>Author:Walter Reed Army Institute of Research</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-long-studied-protein-traumatic-brain-injury.html</b>

Naveen Kaka

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Perceiving the flavor of fat: A Monell Center twins study

Perceiving the flavor of fat: A Monell Center twins study

Most people would agree that the pleasure of some foods stems in part from its fat content. New research, led by the Monell Chemical Senses Center, has now found that liking of fatty food is more complex than its fat content alone—it could also be related to inborn genetic traits of the consumer related to fat perception. The team published their findings in Chemical Senses.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> "Person-to-person diversity in the positive perception of fattiness derives partially from an individual's genetic make-up," said senior author Danielle Reed, Ph.D., Monell Associate Director. "How the taste, smell, and flavor of food and drink affect liking, and therefore the amount and type of food consumed, ultimately affects human health."<br>The team tested adult identical and fraternal twins in 2018 who attended the annual Twins Days Festival in Twinsburg, OH. "We asked the participants to rate low- and high-fat potato chips and report on how fatty they tasted and how much they liked them," said Reed. Participants also spit into a tube so their DNA could be extracted. Their genotype was determined at hundreds of thousands of locations in their genome.<br>Many previous studies using model solutions for greater experimental control have tried to link perception to liking but often failed to translate their data to real foods, noted co-author John Hayes, Ph.D., a Professor of Food Science at the Pennsylvania State University. This study added a real food—potato chips—to the experiment's design to overcome this limitation.<br>Genetically identical twins were more similar in their pattern of liking for the high- and low-fat potato chips compared with the fraternal twins. By comparing the taste-test results from other pairs of twins with similar genotype, the team identified two specific gene variants that correlated with the twins' ratings of liking. Neither of these genes has been previously tied to the perception of fattiness.<br>Although fat is nearly universally liked in foods, some people may be born with the genetic tendency to prefer foods higher or lower in fat. The team's next steps, including understanding how universal these genetic influences might be, will be to test people worldwide and with different types of fat in many different foods, such as pizza, muffins, and ice-cream.<br>Flavor is only one of many factors that drive everyday food choices, including cost, availability, and health. "Most people assume more liking drives more intake, but decades of research tell us the reverse is true—we avoid what we don't like," said Hayes. "I may love bacon, but if I listen to my cardiologist, I'm still not going to eat it every morning."<br> <br><br><b>Author:Monell Chemical Senses Center</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-flavor-fat-monell-center-twins.html</b>

Monika Nagar

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Study finds cancer mortality rate disparity based on hospital ratings

Study finds cancer mortality rate disparity based on hospital ratings

A new paper in the JNCI Cancer Spectrum, published by Oxford University Press, finds that the mortality rates for complex cancer procedures differ greatly between one-star hospitals (10.4%) and five-star hospitals (6.4%).<br> <br><br><br><br><br> The safety of complex cancer surgeries varies widely across hospitals in the United States, with as much as a four-fold difference in hospital mortality rates, volume of patients, hospital experience, and surgeon training. Researchers have previously suggested that a large-scale shift of patients away from high-risk hospitals could meaningfully reduce mortality rates for complex cancer surgeries. Yet there are numerous challenges to matching patients with hospitals that are best suited to perform a specific procedure. In particular, hospital volumes and surgery-specific performance data are not readily available to patients and providers.<br>Researchers examined the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services' "Star Rating" system, which serves as a guide for patients to compare the quality of each hospital's care (one-star = lowest to five-star= highest). This system is based on 62 measurements (e.g. mortality, readmissions, patient experience), but is not specific to any medical operation or patient population. Despite this fact, researchers found that the ratings correlate with quality and safety across many patient care scenarios, including the risk of mortality after complex cancer surgery.<br>A total of 105,823 patients underwent complex cancer procedures at 3,146 hospitals between 2013 and 2016. Eligible patients were over 65 years old with a diagnosis of cancer of the lung, colon, stomach, esophagus, or pancreas. This group captures an estimated 80% of all high-risk cancer surgeries.<br>The mortality rating over a 90-day period correlated with the star system, with the greatest difference observed between the 1-star (10.4%) and 5-star (6.4%) hospitals. However, these rates varied by surgery type.<br>These findings are consistent with prior studies that have found that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services' star rating system correlates with surgical mortality. And yet, the overall effectiveness of this system in choosing hospitals for complex cancer surgeries appears to be modest (84 lives per year), relative to other proposed strategies.<br>"For complex cancer care, choosing the right hospital may be as important as choosing the right treatment.," said Daniel Boffa. "In order for patients to select the best hospital for their situation, they need access to understandable information regarding the safety and quality of hospital care. Unfortunately, the CMS star-rating system, while clear and easy to access, does not appear to distinguish the safest from the least safe hospitals with enough separation to reliably guide cancer patient choice for complex surgical care."<br> <br><br><b>Author:Oxford University Press</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-cancer-mortality-disparity-based-hospital.html</b>

Avinash Kumar

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Getting your protein from plants a recipe for longevity

Getting your protein from plants a recipe for longevity

(HealthDay)—Swapping out tofu for your morning eggs or using beans instead of ground beef in your chili could help you live longer, a new study reports.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Getting your daily protein from plants instead of animals appears to reduce your overall risk of early death, researchers found.<br>Every 3% of a person's daily energy intake coming from plant protein instead of animal protein reduced a person's risk of premature death by 10%, the results showed.<br>The results were particularly strong when people swapped plant protein for eggs (24% lower risk in men and 21% lower risk in women) or red meat (13% lower risk in men, 15% in women).<br>Taking red meat out of your diet can be beneficial, but only if you swap for a healthy substitute, said lead researcher Jiaqi Huang, a postdoctoral fellow at the U.S. National Cancer Institute.<br>"For example, replacement of 3% energy from egg protein or red meat protein with plant protein such as whole grains or cereals resulted in a protective association for overall mortality," Huang said. "On the other hand, replacement of 3% energy from egg protein or red meat protein with other foods such as sugar-sweetened beverages may or may not result in a reduction in mortality."<br>For this study, Huang's team analyzed dietary data from more than 237,000 men and 179,000 women gathered between 1995 and 2011 as part of a long-term study on eating patterns and health.<br>Protein made up about 15% of people's daily diet, with 40% coming from plants and 60% from animals, the researchers found.<br>During 16 years of follow-up, a pattern emerged where plant protein intake appeared to reduce risk of early death. Every 10 grams of plant-for-animal protein swapping per 1,000 calories resulted in a 12% lower risk of death for men and 14% for women, the findings showed.<br>According to senior researcher Dr. Demetrius Albanes, a senior investigator with the cancer institute, "Our data provide evidence to support the favorable role for plant-based diets in the prevention of cardiovascular disease mortality, and that modifications in choices of protein sources may influence health outcomes and longevity." <br><br><br><br><br><br><br>There are many reasons why choosing plant protein over animal protein could help extend your life, the researchers and experts said.<br>Meat protein tends to come with higher levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium and other nutrients that aren't very good for your health, said Connie Diekman, a food and nutrition consultant in St. Louis and a past president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.<br>"For example, one ounce of red meat mixed with whole wheat pasta and veggies would provide much less saturated fat than a 9-ounce steak," Diekman said.<br>On the other hand, plant proteins come with loads of fiber, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, said Kayla Jaeckel, a registered dietitian and diabetes care manager with Mount Sinai Health System in New York City.<br>The researchers also added that there might be something specific about the amino acids formed from the breakdown of animal-based protein that could cause arteries to grow harder or inflammation to occur. Animal protein also could affect the health of people's gut bacteria.<br>One weakness of the study is that it relied on people's memories, as they were asked to remember what they'd eaten and fill out a questionnaire, Diekman said.<br>"This provides a glimpse at diet intake but doesn't show patterns, and patterns are key," Diekman said. "Combining an egg with brown rice and veggies provides a very different nutrient intake than eggs, bacon, biscuits and gravy."<br>These findings also run counter to other recent studies that have shown eggs are healthier than folks believed for decades, Jaeckel said.<br>"I think eggs can be part of a healthy and balanced diet. I wouldn't want eggs to be painted in a negative light, because I feel like there's always been flip-flopping with them," Jaeckel added.<br>Diekman said, "My take on the study, and what I would tell clients, is that evidence continues to grow to support the importance of consuming more plant foods and less animal foods, while also boosting vegetable, whole grain and fruit intake. We can enjoy our favorite, heavy egg or meat dish but probably not every day, and preferably in balance with lots of plant foods."<br>The report was published online July 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.<br> <br><br><b>Author:Dennis Thompson, Healthday Reporter</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-protein-recipe-longevity.html</b>

ROHIT KUMAR PASWAN

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High blood pressure increasingly deadly for black people

High blood pressure increasingly deadly for black people

Cardiovascular deaths related to high blood pressure, often called a silent killer, continued to rise over the last two decades, according to new research, which showed stark health inequities.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Black people had a nearly twofold higher mortality rate than their white peers for hypertension-related heart disease deaths in 2018, according to the study. That year, the death rate for Black men was 206.6 per 100,000 people, compared with 117.2 for white men. The death rates were 132.7 for Black women and 81.5 for white women. That's even after white men experienced the greatest spike during the entire research period.<br>The findings, published Monday in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension, include comprehensive estimates of deaths. Between 2000 and 2018, total annual hypertension-related cardiovascular deaths increased from 171,259 to 270,839. Death rates worsened or stagnated across race-sex groups, undoing earlier improvement, researchers said.<br>"Our analysis underscores how little progress has been made over the past 18 years in reducing hypertension-related mortality among Black Americans," said Dr. Leah Rethy, co-lead author of the study and an internal medicine resident at the University of Pennsylvania. "It is crucial that we act now to identify and address the systemic racial inequalities that drive these differences in mortality."<br>The method used to collect data for the study was unique because high blood pressure is infrequently listed as an underlying cause of death, said Dr. Sadiya S. Khan, the study's other co-lead author.<br>More commonly, hypertension contributes to death through cardiovascular problems, such as ischemic heart disease, heart failure or stroke. Researchers gathered multiple cause of death files from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on people age 25 and older who died with any mention of hypertension.<br>Dr. Paul Whelton, who chaired the AHA and American College of Cardiology's high blood pressure guidelines writing committee and was not involved in the new study, said analyzing death certificates provided an important look at hypertension's effects.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>"We don't see this very often where the researchers are looking at the secondary or contributing causes," said Whelton, a professor at Tulane University in New Orleans and the Show Chwan Health System Endowed Chair in Global Public Health. "We have made strides in improving the problem of high blood pressure, but it's still imperfect, and we have a disparity where there are certain groups who need more targeting to get the help they need."<br>Even though these are big problems for patients to tackle, Whelton said he advocates for making simple changes to improve heart health.<br>"You don't have to do everything. Even small lifestyle and dietary changes are important," Whelton said. "Every little bit helps."<br>Khan, a preventive cardiologist at Northwestern University in Chicago, agrees. She suggests a mix of personal and larger-scale interventions to improve high blood pressure.<br>"There are probably two main avenues I would want to advocate for moving forward," Khan said. "On an individual level, it's essential to be proactive about knowing your numbers and being aware of your blood pressure. The other is for the medical community to find disruptive and innovative ways to help patients manage their blood pressure."<br>Nearly half of U.S. adults—an estimated 116 million—have high blood pressure. It is defined as a reading of 130 or higher as the top number (systolic) or 80 or higher as the bottom number (diastolic). The percentage of people in the United States with high blood pressure increases with each decade of life.<br>The new study reports that despite decreases in smoking and other meaningful improvements in the 21st century to improve cardiovascular health, those benefits were offset by increases in diabetes and obesity. These health problems likely contribute to hypertension-related cardiovascular mortality rates, Khan said.<br>The study also calls for increased resources aimed at preventing and managing hypertension for the populations in urgent need to reduce disparities and preventable deaths.<br>"Health inequities are a large part of the discussion we should be having," Khan said. "The next steps, from a larger national stage, include advocating for policies that eliminate racism and discrimination and enhance access to health care. Nobody should die from a preventable disease."<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-high-blood-pressure-increasingly-deadly.html</b>

Prithviraj Mahto

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Houston leaders call for city lockdown amid virus case surge

Houston leaders call for city lockdown amid virus case surge

Top officials in Houston are calling for the city to lock back down as area hospitals strain to accommodate the onslaught of patients sick with the new coronavirus.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, both Democrats, said this weekend that a stay-at-home order is needed for America's fourth largest city to cope with the surge of COVID-19 cases.<br>"Not only do we need a stay home order now, but we need to stick with it this time until the hospitalization curve comes down, not just flattens," Hidalgo said on Twitter Sunday. "Many communities that persevered in that way are reopening for the long haul. Let's learn from that & not make the same mistake twice."<br>The call comes after a week in which Texas continued to break records for confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths linked to the disease. State health officials reported 8,196 new cases Sunday, another 80 deaths and a total of 10,410 people hospitalized due to the virus.<br>The true number of cases is likely far higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.<br>The decision over a lockdown, however, rests with Republican Gov. Greg Abbott— who has resisted this step, saying it should be a last resort.<br>Abbott led one of America's swiftest reopenings following earlier closures in Texas. But in recent weeks, he reversed course amid swiftly climbing cases.<br>Ahead of Independence Day, the governor ordered bars to close back down and, after undercutting local leaders' power to do so, required people to wear face coverings in public in much of the state.<br>On Friday, Abbott extended a statewide disaster order that warned Texans another shutdown might be needed if the virus' spread isn't contained. He announced Sunday that the federal government will continue to fund large testing centers in Dallas and Houston through the end of July.<br>For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-houston-leaders-city-lockdown-virus.html</b>

Aniket Nishad

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For 'This is Us' actor, stroke survivor is more than a role—it's reality

For 'This is Us' actor, stroke survivor is more than a role—it's reality

For actor Timothy Omundson, art imitates life.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> After suffering a stroke that almost killed him, he was hired to play Gregory, a character on NBC's comedy-drama "This Is Us" who is recovering from a major stroke.<br>Just as Gregory was learning to walk again, so was Omundson.<br>"It was a huge milestone for me," he said. "On the way to filming, my wife pulled the car over and said, 'Two years ago, you almost died, and now we're going to the set of the No. 1 show on TV.' … I'm not back yet, but I'm on the road to getting there."<br>Before the stroke, life was good for the Missouri-born thespian. Married, with two teenage daughters, Omundson was flourishing in his career as a character actor in TV series like "Judging Amy," "Xena: Warrior Princess" and "Psych," in which he portrayed Detective Carlton Lassiter.<br>"My cholesterol was low, my blood pressure was great. I was 47 and in the best shape of my life."<br>That all changed in a matter of seconds. In April 2017, Omundson was getting ready to board a flight at Tampa International Airport when he suddenly collapsed in the men's restroom. Alert bystanders called paramedics, who arrived quickly and rushed him to the hospital.<br>Omundson spent days in intensive care and underwent a craniectomy, in which doctors removed part of his skull to relieve pressure in his brain caused by the stroke.<br>"My stroke was a weird anomaly," he said. "I had a dissected carotid artery that we think came from a strenuous weight-lifting exercise, but we can't pinpoint it exactly."<br>He returned to Los Angeles, where he lived temporarily in physical rehabilitation centers before returning home to his wife and kids. He spent months after the stroke confined to a wheelchair.<br>Gradually, his mobility improved. He began reaching one recovery turning point after the next, from standing up at the bathroom sink to traveling to Las Vegas earlier this year to speak at a fan convention for the CW drama "Supernatural," in which he played Cain.<br>"It was a real big deal to be able to walk onstage, on my own power, with my friend Rob Benedict—another actor on the show who's also a stroke survivor—and to have our wits about us the whole time," he said. "We answered questions for two hours in front of 3,000 people who were cheering us on."<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>When the COVID-19 lockdown started, he immediately began doing his physical rehab via video conferencing. In recent weeks, he's been combining teletherapy with in-person rehab, but he still prefers doing it remotely because it saves the time and hassle of commuting.<br>"I'm shocked at how well it works," he said. "Because my therapists are so good, we've got a pretty good routine going."<br>Physical therapists were well-prepared to do telehealth even before the pandemic since they were already helping "reintegrate" patients into their homes, said Kelly Anne Tierney, Omundson's physical therapist at the Centre for Neuro Skills.<br>"The challenge (now) is simply maximizing the patient's home as a venue," she said. "With Tim, we were able to use household items such as shoeboxes and do real-life activities, such as carrying dishes to the sink while practicing walking without an assistive device."<br>Omundson's post-stroke journey is resonating with other survivors. After appearing on "This Is Us," he received posts on social media from stroke survivors who were thrilled to see someone with their disabilities portrayed on TV.<br>"Hearing that really fueled me," he said.<br>Omundson has returned to playing Detective Lassiter in "Psych 2: Lassie Come Home," a new movie available to stream Wednesday. While he's grateful to work again, he admits acting is a lot more difficult since the stroke.<br>"I used to have this sort of a superpower where I could highlight my lines once and I memorize them, but that took a hit," he said.<br>"I was a very physical actor and comedian with grace in my movement. But now, it's like working in a suit of armor. I used to have a lot of swagger, but it's hard to have swagger when you can't tie your own shoes."<br>But he's not complaining. Last year, actor Luke Perry and "Boyz n the Hood" director John Singleton both died in their early 50s after having strokes. Their deaths reminded him how lucky he is to be alive, with so many supportive family members and friends, he said.<br>"It's easy to get angry and feel sorry for yourself and say, 'This sucks.' I realized early on that's the last thing I need to do."<br>Whenever he gets frustrated, he takes out his phone and looks at his "recovery album" of videos, starting with a clip showing the first steps he took after his stroke.<br>"It reminds me how far I've come," he said. "The healing process isn't a sprint, it's a marathon."<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-actor-survivor-roleit-reality.html</b>

Manish Bhagat

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COVID-19: Considering meditation and yoga as adjunctive treatment

COVID-19: Considering meditation and yoga as adjunctive treatment

The anti-inflammatory and other beneficial effects of meditation and yoga practices make them potential adjunctive treatments of COVID-19, according to the peer-reviewed journal JACM, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.<br> <br><br><br><br><br>Deepak Chopra, University of California, San Diego and William Bushell of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and co-authors from Harvard University and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health describe the anti-inflammatory effects associated with meditation and yoga.<br>The "brief overview of key subjects" found "there is evidence of stress and inflammation modulation, and also preliminary evidence for possible forms of immune system enhancement, accompanying the practice of certain forms of meditation, yoga, and pranayama, along with potential implications for counteracting some forms of infectious challenges." The authors also "readily acknowledge that in the context of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the ideas put forth in this article must be put to further rigorous scientific investigation."<br>JACM Editor-in-Chief John Weeks, johnweeks-integrator.com, Seattle, WA, states: "The paper is another in a series in JACM and in other integrative medicine journals suggesting that research agencies in the United States and Europe would serve their citizens by upping their exploration of the potential contributions of natural health practices, especially amidst the present dearth of conventional treatments."<br> <br><br><b>Author:Mary Ann Liebert, Inc</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-covid-meditation-yoga-adjunctive-treatment.html</b>

Shubham Sinha

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Former Tinder VP Jeff Morris Jr. opens up Product Club, an accelerator meant to stay small and focused

Former Tinder VP Jeff Morris Jr. opens up Product Club, an accelerator meant to stay small and focused

Startup accelerators tend to grow the size of each new class over time, as more of their portfolio companies find exits, their network of mentors expands, and they find new ways to scale things up. The most recognized example of this is almost certainly Y Combinator, which started with a group of just eight companies in 2005 and has since grown to over 150 companies per recent batch.<br>VC and former Tinder VP Jeff Morris Jr. is taking a different approach with his new accelerator, Product Club: starting small, and staying small.<br>The first batch of Product Club companies will be made up of just three companies. While Morris tells me this might grow a bit over time, he doesn’t see it expanding drastically. “I imagine it being up to ten,” he says. “But no more.”<br>“I’ve spoken to a lot of people who’ve built accelerators and have said ‘There’s no way you’ll find a winner with class sizes that small’,” Morris tells me. “But I’m kind of okay with that if it means we can be more hands-on.”<br>Product Club will invest $100k in each company, taking 5% equity in return. In addition to investment, the program will provide one-on-one mentorship with a different mentor each week, with each session “100% focused on product development.”<br>Though new, Product Club has already built up a pretty notable roster of mentors, including:<br><br>Danny Trinh (Head of Design at Zenly)<br>Merci Victoria Grace (Investor at Lightspeed, formerly Head of Growth at Slack)<br>Scott Belsky (Founder of Behance, CPO at Adobe)<br>Sriram Krishnan (Investor, formerly led consumer product teams at Twitter)<br>Manik Gupta (Investor, former Chief Product Officer at Uber)<br>Brian Norgard (Investor, former CPO at Tinder)<br>Jules Walter (Product monetization at Slack, co-founder of the BlackPM network)<br>Josh Elman (Board Partner at Greylock, Investor, former VP of Product at Robinhood)<br><br>They’ve also partnered with a handful of product designers who will provide hands-on help to the companies on things like branding and UX.<br>Morris tells me that he intends for Product Club to be a good bit more transparent than other accelerators traditionally have been. Rather than keeping things largely under wraps until Demo Day, he says, they’re “just going to tell everybody from the start who’s in each batch,” with the intent of doing things like founder office hours with users, with product development and changes happening mostly out in the open “almost like a change log.” They’ll have a Demo Day for investors, but it’ll be more of an overview and less of a reveal.<br>Product Club will operate as part of Chapter One, the early stage seed fund that Morris founded in 2017. Prior to becoming an investor, Morris led the revenue team at Tinder where he built things like Tinder Gold — the dating app’s subscription tier which lets you see who “liked” you without you first having to swipe. He was also the Director of Product Growth at Lambda School for a few months prior to parting ways with the company to focus on investing full time.<br>The program’s first session (the Summer 2020 batch) is scheduled to start on August 3rd, running for a total of ten weeks. They’re accepting applications immediately, with the deadline to apply currently set for July 19th. The program will be entirely remote, so applications are open globally.<br><br><b>Author:Greg Kumparak</b><br><b>Source:https://techcrunch.com/2020/07/13/former-tinder-vp-jeff-morris-jr-opens-up-product-club-an-accelerator-meant-to-stay-small-and-focused/</b>

Rani Rupam

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Hope Mars mission: How to watch the historic launch Tuesday

Hope Mars mission: How to watch the historic launch Tuesday

b'The Hope probe (Al Amal) will circle Mars on a 55 day orbit, analyzing its atmosphere. The United Arab Emirates will head to Mars for the first time on Tuesday. From Tanegashima, a Japanese island in the north Pacific ocean, a Mitsubishi H-IIA booster will carry a car-sized probe known as "Al Amal," or "Hope," to space -- and onto the red planet. The probe is expected to\xc2\xa0reach orbit around the red planet in early 2021. It\'s designed to give a full picture of the Martian atmosphere, offering a holistic view of how Mars\' climate varies during the year. From the cosmos to your inbox. Get the latest space stories from CNET every week. The\xc2\xa0launch from Tanegashima, Japan, opens\xc2\xa0Tuesday, July 14, at 1:51 p.m. PT. It\'ll\xc2\xa0launch on a Mitsubishi H-IIA booster. The rocket isn\'t quite as famous as the likes of\xc2\xa0SpaceX\'s Falcon 9 or Falcon Heavy rockets, but it does have a great launch history, with over 40 successful launches under its belt, mostly of Japanese satellite systems. The\xc2\xa0Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre will carry a livestream\xc2\xa0of the launch from Japan, which you can\xc2\xa0watch via this link. Or, tune into the livestream below: Hope is the first interplanetary mission led by an Arab, Muslim-majority country and, if successful, will add another nation to the list of Martian explorers. "The intent was not to put a message or declaration to the world," Sarah Al Amiri, chair of the UAE Council of Scientists and deputy project manager for the Emirates Mars Mission,\xc2\xa0told CNET in March. "It was, for us, more of an internal reinforcement of what the UAE is about." \xc2\xa0The historic launch is set to be livestreamed across the globe. The satellite will study the connections between Mars\' lower and upper atmosphere and examine what causes the loss of hydrogen and oxygen into space. It\'ll collect data for two years after achieving its orbit around Mars in February 2021. There\'s an option to extend the mission to 2025. Aboard Hope are three instruments which will enable the probe to study the Martian atmosphere more intensely. There\'s a high-resolution camera known as the Emirates eXploration Imager (EXI), a UV imager known as the Emirates Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EMUS), and a scanning infrared imager dubbed the Emirates Mars InfraRed Spectrometer (EMIRS).'<br><br><b>Author:Abrar Al-Heeti, <br> Jackson Ryan</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/how-to/hope-mars-mission-how-to-watch-the-historic-launch-tomorrow/</b>

Sanjana Bhat

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How to watch the 2021 Ford Bronco reveal live tonight

How to watch the 2021 Ford Bronco reveal live tonight

b'The\xc2\xa0Ford\xc2\xa0reveal on Monday is a very big deal to a lot of people -- us included -- and while the COVID-19 pandemic\xc2\xa0may have delayed the Blue Oval\'s reveal timeline (along with just about everything else), the pandemic did do one thing that should work out pretty well for you: see Bronco unveiled live along with us. The coronavirus caused the Bronco\'s reveal to be shifted to an online format instead of at an auto show or a private event, so now you can kick back in your finest sweatpants on today at 5 p.m. Pacific/8 p.m. Eastern and watch the sheet come off what could be the coolest American SUV since Ford stopped slapping Eddie Bauer badges on Broncos in the \'90s. Maybe even cooler. Yes, there was That Leak on Friday, but if you\'re like us, all that did was make you even more psyched to watch the reveal. We\'re certainly\xc2\xa0 not happy with just one picture and neither should you be. In fact, if you\'re all excited to watch, you\'re probably wondering exactly how you should go about watching Ford reveal its new SUVs. The good news is that it\'ll be easy. You need only bookmark and revisit this very article (or click this link), and you\'ll be in the virtual front row along with all us auto journalists. Here\'s a leaked photo of the two-door Bronco, just to show you it\'s worth getting excited about. If you don\'t want to watch the whole unveil and just want the highlights, you can check out ABC, ESPN, the National Geographic channel, and Hulu, which will all be airing snippets of the festivities during other programs. ABC\'s will go up during the Country Music Association\'s "Best Of Fest," while ESPN\'s will air during SportsCenter. NatGeo will show up during National Parks: Yosemite and Hulu will broadcast all the different spots along with a curated collection of outdoorsy and off-road content. That said, your best bet for the most extensive reveal presentation will be right here -- Ford is planning a longer presentation on YouTube than on those networks. If you\'re still on the fence about the Bronco, we\'ll offer you a brief refresher. To start, the Bronco is coming back after a quarter-century hiatus to find most of its biggest competitors (Chevrolet Blazer, RamCharger, etc.) pushing up daisies. Unfortunately for Ford, the Jeep Wrangler is still around, and it\'s spent the intervening decades sharpening its teeth off-road and becoming a much more livable vehicle. There\'s also a new and very compelling new Land Rover Defender just hitting the market, too. We know that the new Bronco won\'t just be a single model, it\'ll be a family. Broncos will be available in a larger off-roader format with more traditional styling and a smaller, more crossover-like Bronco Sport version. The big Bronco will have a solid rear axle and independent front suspension and be available in some pretty great colors. It\'ll have a 7-speed manual transmission option as well as a 10-speed automatic, and it will likely get power from a turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder or an optional 2.7-liter turbo V6. The baby Bronco will share some of its hardware with Ford\'s new Escape, but significantly more off-road capability is promised. Beyond that, you\'ll have to wait until later today when the sheet comes off to find out more.'<br><br><b>Author:Kyle Hyatt</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/roadshow/news/how-to-watch-ford-bronco-reveal-live/</b>

MOHIT RANJAN

oS4XSnMBFOekF3BlaoFB

SpaceX launch of first South Korean military satellite delayed Tuesday

SpaceX launch of first South Korean military satellite delayed Tuesday

b'The Falcon 9 booster for the Anasis-II mission is a history-making rocket. It was the booster used to deliver NASA astronauts to the ISS in May. SpaceX has postponed a Falcon 9 launch three times in the span of five days, with the latest delay affecting the Anasis-II mission to send a South Korean military satellite to orbit.\xc2\xa0The company tweeted Monday that it was pushing back blast-off "to take a closer look at the second stage, swap hardware if needed." Standing down from tomorrow\xe2\x80\x99s launch of ANASIS-II to take a closer look at the second stage, swap hardware if needed. Will announce new target launch date once confirmed on the Range SpaceX also\xc2\xa0postponed its latest Starlink launch last Wednesday and then again on Saturday. The Anasis-II mission will eventually lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. If it happens before the Starlink mission, which is currently awaiting a new launch date, it will be SpaceX\'s 12th\xc2\xa0launch this year, the 90th flight of a Falcon 9 and the second overall for this particular booster, which was first flown in May to deliver NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station -- the first time a commercial company has done so. Ergo, it\'s got some history. There is a backup launch window scheduled for the same time on July 15, but we\'ll have to wait and see how quickly the technical issues can be worked out. The payload, Anasis-II, is South Korea\'s first military communications satellite. Because of its use in the military, there\'s not a lot of information about Anasis-II, but for the fact it\'s based off the Eurostar E3000 satellite bus, according to the Everyday Astronaut. We\'ll update this post once we have a new launch date. '<br><br><b>Author:Jackson Ryan</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/how-to/spacex-launch-of-first-south-korean-military-satellite-delayed-tuesday/</b>

Rani Rupam

xLoXSnMB_V_LWfVUa-Bg

Apple probably won't reopen its offices until 2021, report says

Apple probably won't reopen its offices until 2021, report says

b"Apple doesn't think it'll be back to normal working operations this year. As coronavirus cases surge across the US, Apple reportedly no longer thinks it will be able to have corporate employees return to work in the offices in 2020. The tech giant is also encouraging retail employees to work remotely as more store locations shutter, according to a report from Bloomberg on Monday. Apple didn't immediately respond to request for comment. The tech giant, which held its annual\xc2\xa0Worldwide Developers Conference\xc2\xa0digitally last month, began closing stores internationally and restricting employee travel in early March. Later that month, Apple made the call to keep\xc2\xa0all its stores shuttered indefinitely. While some Apple stores began to re-open in May, rising numbers of coronavirus cases led the company to close them once again this month. People can still shop online. The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives."<br><br><b>Author:Shelby Brown</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/health/apple-probably-wont-reopen-its-offices-until-2021-report-says/</b>

Mangaldeep Singh

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SaaS and cloud stocks finally give back ground

SaaS and cloud stocks finally give back ground

After a heated run, SaaS and cloud stocks dipped sharply during regular trading on Monday.<br>According to the category-tracking Bessemer cloud index, public SaaS and cloud stocks dropped around 6.5% today, a material blow to the value of some of the world’s most highly valued companies, measured by sector-averaged revenue multiples.<br>After recovering all their COVID-19-related losses earlier this year, SaaS and cloud stocks kept on rising, reaching new all-time highs with regularity. But earnings season is starting, meaning that the value of modern software and digital infrastructure companies will soon be tested against Q2 results — results that were recorded fully during the global pandemic.<br>To hear bulls — both private and public — tell the story, COVID-19 and its ensuing workplace disruptions have provided software companies with a huge boon. Namely, that customers current and future have radically changed their procurement models and will need more software solutions, more quickly, than they previously anticipated. (Stay tuned to The Exchange for more on this later in the week.)<br>The thought that there are more and better customers coming for SaaS and cloud companies made them relative safe havens in otherwise turbulent public markets; while other industries had uncertain demand curves, the thinking went, software companies were being pushed forward by an accelerating secular shift.<br>Today, however, the broader markets slipped from early-day positions of strength while SaaS and cloud shares dropped sharply. Prior patterns in investor behavior didn’t hold up, in other words.<br><br>What do investors bidding up tech shares know that the rest of us don’t?<br><br>Why today brought such sharp selling is not clear. No more, really, than reasons for prior days’ gains were clear at the time. Profit taking? Rotation to other sectors? Whatever you want to ascribe to the day’s declines you can make stick.<br>For our purposes here at TechCrunch, the dropping share prices of public software companies serves as an anti-signal for late-stage valuations in SaaS startups, and a general headwind toward venture investors making more early-stage bets in the sector. Of course, one day doesn’t change the game. But several days of sharp losses could begin to change sentiment, and days when shares of modern software companies drop by 6% are few and far between.<br>Earnings are next, but for many companies in the SaaS and cloud world, reporting their results just got easier. When expectations drop, everyone loses a bit of worry, right?<br><br><b>Author:Alex Wilhelm</b><br><b>Source:https://techcrunch.com/2020/07/13/saas-and-cloud-stocks-finally-give-back-ground/</b>

Ashish Mahato

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