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Study shows humans are optimists for most of life

Study shows humans are optimists for most of life

Is middle age really the "golden age" when people are the most optimistic in life? Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when, as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> "We found that optimism continued to increase throughout young adulthood, seemed to steadily plateau and then decline into older adulthood," said William Chopik, MSU assistant professor of psychology at MSU and lead author. "Even people with fairly bad circumstances, who have had tough things happen in their lives, look to their futures and life ahead and felt optimistic."<br>The study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, surveyed 75,000 American, German and Dutch people between the ages of 16 and 101 to measure optimism and their outlook about the future. Chopik said the researchers looked at life events such as: marriage, divorce, a new job, retirement, changes in health and loss of a partner, a parent or a child.<br>"Counterintuitively—and most surprising—we found that really hard things like deaths and divorce really didn't change a person's outlook to the future," Chopik said. "This shows that a lot of people likely subscribe to the 'life is short' mantra and realize they should focus on things that make them happy and maintain emotional balance."<br>Chopik explained that regardless of life's good and bad circumstances, from the time people are 15 to almost 60 or 70, they become more and more optimistic.<br>"There's a massive stretch of life during which you keep consistently looking forward to things and the future," Chopik said. "Part of that has to do with experiencing success both in work and life. You find a job, you meet your significant other, you achieve your goals and so on. You become more autonomous and you are somewhat in control of your future; so, you tend to expect things to turn out well."<br>As people age into the elderly phase of life, the study showed a shift to declines in optimism, likely driven by health-related concerns and knowing that the bulk of life is behind you. While the elderly aren't full-fledge pessimists, Chopik said, there is still a noticeable change.<br>"Retirement age is when people can stop working, have time to travel and to pursue their hobbies," Chopik said. "But very surprisingly, people didn't really think that it would change the outlook of their lives for the better."<br>Chopik said one of the most profound conclusions in the study was showing how resilient people are in life.<br>"We oftentimes think that the really sad or tragic things that happen in life completely alter us as people, but that's not really the case," Chopik said. "You don't fundamentally change as a result of terrible things; people diagnosed with an illness or those who go through another crisis still felt positive about the future and what life had ahead for them on the other side."<br> <br><br><b>Author:Michigan State University</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-humans-optimists-life.html</b>

SHASHI RANJAN

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Is your iPhone battery healthy? What about your Mac or Apple Watch? How to check

Is your iPhone battery healthy? What about your Mac or Apple Watch? How to check

b"How healthy is your iPhone's battery? Several years ago, Apple was caught slowing down older iPhones\xc2\xa0without their owners' knowledge or consent. Apple eventually came clean, explaining that as the health of the battery inside the iPhone degrades, the company decided to hobble performance in order to avoid random shutdowns and other potential issues. After the blowback, Apple added a Battery Health feature to the iPhone, revealing how well -- or poorly -- your iPhone battery is performing, and letting you know when it's time to have the battery replaced. Now, the same battery checkup tool is coming to the Apple Watch WatchOS 7, while the MacOS Big Sur will get new battery stats this fall. Here's how to find more insight into the longevity of your iPhone and Apple Watch battery, and how you'll use the new Mac battery tools once they arrive. It takes a couple of taps to view your battery's health. The process for checking your iPhone's battery is just as straightforward in iOS 14 beta as it was when Apple first introduced the feature in 2018. Follow these steps on your iPhone: 1. Open the Settings app. 2. Scroll down and select Battery. 3. Tap Battery Health, where you'll find a report detailing your battery's health percentage, and any suggested steps you can take to improve performance. If iOS determines through its diagnostics that you need a new battery, the software that slows performance will kick on. The battery health app will also\xc2\xa0recommend getting it replaced, a task that can cost up to $80. You'll need to have WatchOS 7 installed in order to review your battery's status. Currently, that means you'll need to take part in the developer program. Apple will run a public beta program for the Apple Watch sometime in July if you don't have a developer account, or you can wait until the official release this fall. 1. Open the Settings app. 2. Scroll down and tap on Battery. 3. Tap Battery Health. On the next screen, you'll see a percentage indicating how healthy your battery is, as well as any advice on how to improve it. With WatchOS 7, you can keep tabs on your battery's health. Apple had already added a Battery Health feature to the Mac with the release of MacOS 10.15.5 in April of this year, and with MacOS Big Sur, Apple brings new tools to help reveal which apps are draining your MacBook. It's the first time this kind of information has been available on the Mac, allowing you to view usage over the last 24 hours or 10 days. Here's what to do. 1. Open System Preferences, either by clicking on the Apple logo in the menu bar at the top of your screen or in the Applications menu. 2. Click on the Battery option. The new battery section will graph and chart your battery usage, similar to what you see in iOS or iPadOS right now, letting you know if there's an app that's running in the background and causing the excess drain. If you want to view your Battery Health right now, you can open System Preferences > Power Saver and click on the Battery Health button at the bottom of the window. You'll see the health status of your Mac's battery, as well as have the option to turn off Battery Health Management; a feature that will adjust performance and the maximum charge of your MacBook's battery based on how you use your laptop. Your MacBook's battery is fairly important. You likely noticed the option to turn Optimized Battery Charging on or off when viewing the battery health screen on your Watch or iPhone. I suggest turning it on to help extend the overall life of your battery and prevent degradation. When turned on, that Apple Device will learn your charging routine and instead of immediately charging that device to 100% and keeping it there overnight, it will charge and hold at 80% until right before you typically take your device off the charger, which is when it will complete charging. In turn, Optimized Battery Charging limits the amount of time the battery is kept fully charged -- something that over time can be harmful to the battery's health. This same feature is also coming to AirPods ($159 at Apple) when iOS 14 is released. Pretty cool stuff. From a brand-new messages app and upgraded Safari on the Mac, new health features on the Apple Watch to six features in iOS 14 you're sure to love, there are plenty more changes coming to Apple hardware this fall."<br><br><b>Author:Jason Cipriani</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/how-to/is-your-iphone-battery-healthy-what-about-your-mac-or-apple-watch-how-to-check/</b>

Ashish Mahato

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This three-piece mesh network covers about 5,400 square feet for $130

This three-piece mesh network covers about 5,400 square feet for $130

b"Mesh networks solve a problem that seems to plague virtually everyone: They plug the inevitable dead zones in your house without adding Wi-Fi extenders, which never work very well and introduce their own annoyances. CNET has rounded up the\xc2\xa0best mesh routers for 2020, and while they're great, they tend to cost $250 or more. Here's an affordable alternative: The Rock Space Dual Band AC1200 is a three-piece mesh router that costs just $130 right now. It usually sells for $170, but you can save $40 by clipping the coupon on the product page and then using discount code HJJC5RWD at checkout. Rock Space says this system can cover about 5,400 square feet, or a three-story home, and push Wi-Fi into the garage and basement. Like any mesh router, it gives you a single SSID for your whole home (that's the downside of Wi-Fi extenders -- SSIDs that change depending upon where you are in the house) and is easy to set up and configure via a mobile app. The dual channels give you both 2.4 and 5GHz networks, and it's rated for 1,167 megabits per second. The satellites themselves don't look like routers at all; as small black cubes, they look more like small speakers and aren't unattractive, so you can place them on shelves or desktops around the house without worrying too much about aesthetics. The deal price of $130 makes the Rock Space router kit priced close to the dual-band Netgear Orbi mentioned in the best for 2020 list, but the Orbit only has two satellites, while Rock Space includes three. That said, if the Netgear Orbi is selling for $100 flat at Walmart right now. Get all the latest deals delivered to your inbox. It's FREE! CNET's Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate\xc2\xa0on Facebook\xc2\xa0and\xc2\xa0Twitter. Find more great buys on the\xc2\xa0CNET Deals page\xc2\xa0and check out our\xc2\xa0CNET Coupons page\xc2\xa0for the latest promo codes from\xc2\xa0Best Buy,\xc2\xa0Walmart,\xc2\xa0Amazon\xc2\xa0and\xc2\xa0more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page."<br><br><b>Author:Dave Johnson</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/news/this-three-piece-mesh-network-covers-about-5400-square-feet-for-130/</b>

Priyanka Gill

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California reverses reopening decisions as coronavirus surges

California reverses reopening decisions as coronavirus surges

b'US coronavirus cases mapped as of July 13. California has reversed course on reopening during COVID-19, with Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday saying the state will close all bars. Indoor operations of restaurants, wineries, movie theaters, zoos, museums and card rooms statewide must also be closed. Newsom cited coronavirus cases spreading "at alarming rates" in California. In addition, 30 Californian counties must close indoor operations for gyms, hair salons, barbershops, malls, places of worship, non-critical offices and personal care services. Keep track of the coronavirus pandemic. The counties impacted are Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Sacramento, Colusa, Contra Costa, Fresno, Glenn, Imperial, Kern, Kings, Madera, Marin, Merced, Monterey, Napa, Placer, Riverside, San Benito, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Barbara, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tulare, Yolo, Yuba and Ventura. The Los Angeles and San Diego school districts on Monday also announced they will be continuing online-only learning when school starts again in the fall. COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus, has\xc2\xa0rapidly spread across the globe. There are now\xc2\xa0almost 13 million confirmed cases\xc2\xa0globally. In the US, there have been\xc2\xa03.3 million cases confirmed and over 135,000 deaths, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. A\xc2\xa0vaccine may not arrive until 2021. The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.'<br><br><b>Author:Corinne Reichert</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/health/california-reverses-reopening-decisions-as-coronavirus-surges/</b>

Yash Johal

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Retail payments report recovery in May, jump 23% to Rs 24.22 trillion

Retail payments report recovery in May, jump 23% to Rs 24.22 trillion

After seeing a plunge in April amid the lockdown, retail payments reported a recovery in May, jumping 23 per cent to Rs 24.22 trillion in value terms, against Rs 19.66 trillion in April, the Reserve Bank of India monthly bulletin data showed. In March, retail payments in value terms were to the tune of Rs 36.03 trillion.Total payments that include digital payments and payments made via paper-based instruments rose 12.5 per cent to Rs 94.64 trillion in May, against Rs 84.10 trillion in April.<br><br><br><br><br> <br><p>Digital payments saw 11.6 per cent rise to Rs 92.03 trillion in May, against Rs 82.46 trillion in April.<br> <br><p>While card payments posted over 60 per cent recovery, ATM cash withdrawals in value terms rose to Rs 1.96 trillion in May, against Rs 1.29 trillion in April.Digital payments saw 11.6 per cent rise to Rs 92.03 trillion in May, against Rs 82.46 trillion in April.While card payments posted over 60 per cent recovery, ATM cash withdrawals in value terms rose to Rs 1.96 trillion in May, against Rs 1.29 trillion in April.<br><br><b>Author:Subrata Panda <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> |  <br><p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> Mumbai</b><br><b>Source:https://www.business-standard.com/article/finance/retail-payments-report-recovery-in-may-jump-23-to-rs-24-22-trillion-120071400068_1.html</b>

Aishwarya Agrawal

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The best facial moisturizers you can buy in 2020

The best facial moisturizers you can buy in 2020

b'Skin care is one of my most important self-care rituals, and if I had to keep only one item out of the variety of\xc2\xa0skincare products\xc2\xa0that I use, it would be moisturizer. A great moisturizer can impart a healthy glow while relieving dryness and calming your skin, but one that is too harsh, too heavy, irritating or not moisturizing enough can throw off how you feel for the whole day. Everyone has unique skin types and needs, but according to dermatologist Dr. Caren Campbell, you should use a moisturizer every day. But not every moisturizer will work for everyone -- it\'s why your mom can have one that she swears by but if you try it, you break out. Campbell says two things to look for are if moisturizers are more oil-based (usually a face cream) or water-based (usually labeled a face lotion). "If you can categorize yourself as dry you know to go for a cream. If your skin is combination, it might mean you use cream in the winter and lotion in the summer when the humidity is higher," she says. Below, you\'ll find the best moisturizers for all different concerns, from dry skin to oily skin, mature skin to adolescent skin, and, of course for those with a sensitive skin type. So many facial skin types, so many products to meet all of their needs! The list below highlights the top sellers across sites like Amazon, Sephora and Target. You\'ll find some tried-and-true brands and some newer finds -- and the prices range from high-end to more affordable drugstore finds. You\'re sure to find something that will be worth adding to your skin care routine. Note that these products and services are independently chosen by our editors, based on extensive research into the available options in the marketplace. The prices and availability are accurate as of publishing time, but may change. Read more:\xc2\xa0Best beauty tools and gadgets in 2020: Nuface, Foreo and more This is the daily moisturizer I\'ve currently been using every single night since I received it as a gift for Christmas. It feels very nourishing, but not heavy. It is perfect for my skin since I can layer it over my other serums and still feel like my skin can breathe. When I wake up the next morning, my skin always looks and feels amazing. This product gets extra bonus points from me since Drunk Elephant is a clean/nontoxic skincare brand, and all of the products are fragrance-free. This top-seller on Sephora is the best face moisturizer for daytime wear for all skin types and is also a steal at $5. I\'ve been using products from The Ordinary for months since a friend/beauty editor recommended them to me. I\'ve been using this as a daytime moisturizer and it is surprisingly rich and hydrating given the price tag. It works for basically any skin type and is nongreasy. Tip: I layer it over The Ordinary\'s Hylaronic acid serum\xc2\xa0when my skin feels like it needs extra moisture. SkinMedica\'s HA5 Rejuvenating Skin Hydrator is a serum that works as your facial moisturizer. Developed for signs of aging skin like wrinkles, fine lines, and rough texture -- the serum contains a blend of five different types of hydrators designed to smooth the skin\'s texture. It does have a hefty price tag -- but the brand (founded by a dermatologist) promises 8 straight hours of moisture and clinical-level results. The Water Cream by Tatcha has around 2,000 reviews and is a bestseller on Sephora -- a sign that this is a cult favorite. The cream is a lightweight moisturizer that is oil-free, great for those who are acne prone or have more oily skin. Sometimes I have to switch to a lighter moisturizer in the summer, so this one will be at the top of my "to buy" list for those long, hot and humid days. Cerave Moisturizing cream is a tried-and-true favorite for Campbell. She likes it for patients with dry skin since it contains ceramides and is a cream -- meaning it provides more moisture since it has more oil than water. It\'s also a bestseller on Amazon out of all facial moisturizers sold. According to Glamour\xc2\xa0this French facial cream is recommended by nearly every makeup artist out there. I have used this moisturizer as well and remember seeing it at all the pharmacies when I lived in France. It\'s a tried-and-true favorite -- when I had it in my product rotation I used it on days when my skin felt drier and loved it. This gel moisturizer from Neutrogena is a bestseller at Target. It\'s formulated for dry skin and contains hyaluronic acid, a super moisturizing active ingredient. According to Campbell, "hyaluronic acid is one of the most moisturizing ingredients for skin. It pulls 1,000 times its weight in water." Dry skin: Symptoms of dry skin include scaling and or itchiness. "Patients with very dry skin tend to have a genetic mutation in a protein called filaggrin which helps lock moisture in the skin and keep the outside environment out. But with this mutation too much water evaporates from the skin and allergens get into the skin. Patients with filaggrin mutations are more likely to develop eczema (atopic dermatitis)," she says. You should opt for a cream, since it contains more oil and will feel more moisturizing than a water-based lotion. Normal skin: Signs you have normal skin include that you show no breakouts, no excessive dryness, oily skin and no blackheads. "If your skin is the envy of all -- low maintenance, you likely have normal skin. If you won the genetic lottery and barely wash your face and yet not one zit or flake resides on the skin, you likely have normal skin." For this type she recommends using a product with peptides or hyaluronic acid to lock in moisture and nourish the skin. You can also look for antioxidants to help protect your skin from free radicals and oxidative stress. Oily skin: Signs of oily skin include shiny skin, blackheads on the nose, and whiteheads or pimples. For this skin type, you want to avoid creams and stick to lighter moisturizers. Combination skin: Combination skin means you have oily skin in some areas and dry skin in others. You may have an oily "T" zone in your nose, chin, or middle part of your cheeks. You can also have scaly or flaky skin on the side of your cheeks or forehead."If you feel like you need one product for the center of your face and another for the sides, you are likely a combo skin type," Campbell says. You\'ll likely need to use two products -- one for the oily parts of your skin and another for the dry. Sensitive Skin: If you have sensitive skin, a product that doesn\'t contain fragrance is best. Sensitive skin means you get itchiness or rashes, broken blood vessels, or you have burning or stinging when you apply skincare products. The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.'<br><br><b>Author:Mercey Livingston</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/health/best-facial-moisturizers-to-buy-for-2020-skinmedicathe-ordinary-drunk-elephant-and-more/</b>

Rahul Kumar

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Best back-to-school gear under $100 for 2020

Best back-to-school gear under $100 for 2020

b'Going back to school in 2020 might involve home-based learning, a social-distanced on-campus experience or something in between. But however the students in your life return to the classroom, they\'re definitely going to need gadgets to help them work -- and play. And to help, we\'ve assembled some of our favorite gear in the $50 to $100 price range. Anker\'s Soundcore Motion Plus is larger than many mini Bluetooth speakers, but it\'s still compact and manages to sound fuller than much of the competition under $100, with bigger bass, more volume and better clarity. It\'s also fully waterproof (IPX7 rated) and has support for the aptX streaming codec for supporting devices such as Samsung\'s Galaxy phones. Battery life is rated at 12 hours at moderate volume levels. There\'s even an app for tweaking the sound. It\'s an excellent value at $100. Blue or red versions are available for $6 more.\xc2\xa0\n \n \n \n Read our Anker Soundcore Motion Plus review. The Hyperice Hypershere Mini is a social-distance-friendly alternative to a massage at the end of a stressful schoolday. About the size of a softball (3-inch diameter), it charges with a Micro-USB cable (a full charge offers more than 2 hours of battery life) and does a great job of rolling out your muscles, with three speeds to choose from. It also travels well. The Soundcore listed above is our new pick for best sound quality in the sub-$100 price field. But that model is pretty beefy. By contrast, Bose\'s fully waterproof SoundLink Micro fits into the palm of a hand, and it delivers impressive sound for its small size. I haven\'t heard of anyone not liking this as a gift, and it can sometimes be found on sale for $20 off.\n \n \n \n Read our Bose SoundLink Micro review. Why buy AirPods or other name-brand truly wireless headphones, which can cost $160 and up? The Anker Soundcore Life P2 earbuds deliver solid sound quality for around $60 and are also decent for making calls.\n \n \n \n Read our Anker Soundcore Life P2 review. I\'ve been a fan of Logitech\'s earlier\xc2\xa0MX Master\xc2\xa0and\xc2\xa0MX Master 2S\xc2\xa0mice, which shared the same design. For the MX Master 3, Logitech\'s engineers have made some upgrades to both the design and the mechanics of the mouse, most noticeably to the scroll wheel, which is driven by electromagnets and is buttery-smooth to operate. It\'s fast and quiet -- you can zip through thousands of lines in seconds when you switch from ratchet to free-spin mode. This stylish mouse costs just less than $100, and it\'s a neat upgrade for students who want a break from a stubborn trackpad.\n \n \n Read our Logitech MX Master 3 first take. This wireless speaker is a colorful alternative to the Anker and Bose models above. It\'s pretty compact and offers better -- and bigger -- sound than some of its slimmer and smaller rivals. It really can float and has better battery life than the original Wonderboom, too.\n \n \n Read our UE Wonderboom 2 first take. Step up from that cramped laptop (or iPad) keyboard with Logitech\'s MX Keys -- arguably the smartest low-profile Logitech keyboard I\'ve used. It has "spherically dished" keys that cradle the tips of your fingers, and the keyboard is responsive and tactile. In that sense, it\'s similar to Logitech\'s\xc2\xa0Craft keyboard, which lists for twice the price. The keys light up as your hands approach and there\'s a sensor that adjusts the illumination according to the lighting conditions. You can also turn off the light if you want to save battery life. The dual layout is designed to suit both Mac and Windows users, and MX Keys is compatible with Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android systems. Using illumination, you can get 10 days of operation on a full charge or up to five months with backlighting turned off. When it\'s time to recharge, the battery indicator LED glows red and you can continue using the keyboard while charging via USB-C.\n \n \n Read our Logitech MX Keys first take. The perfect gift for an absent-minded student is now better than ever: For a limited time, CNET is partnering with Tile to offer bundles of the company\'s wireless trackers with a free Google Nest Mini thrown in at no extra charge. Save up to $40 over the usual bundle price when getting a four-pack. Students (or anyone else) can use their phone or smart speaker to locate missing gadgets, wallets or backpacks -- whatever they\'ve attached these mini trackers to. Earbuds are great, but if you\'re buying for a student who prefers full-size wireless headphones, this model (yes, Anker again) delivers solid sound for just $60 -- and with passable noise cancellation and great battery life, too. We love Sonos Wi-Fi speakers but the cheapest models generally start at around $180. Unless, that is, you go for the this Sonos-designed Symfonisk speaker that\'s sold through Ikea. This is the perfect alternative for delivering similarly great Sonos wireless sound at half the price of the Sonos One. You lose compatibility with Alexa and Google Assistant, but for privacy-minded students, that\'s a feature, not a bug.\n \n \n \n Read our Ikea Symfonisk Bookshelf WiFi Speaker review. Yes, Amazon\'s Echo Show 8 is a fantastic smart display and a great gift for anyone with an Alexa household, but some of us prefer the Google Nest Hub. It\'s less likely to push Amazon products on the screen, for one thing. Plus,\xc2\xa0the voice assistant is a bit more intuitive and there\'s no camera, so it feels more comfortable in the bedroom. Whichever you choose, seek out a discount: These are often on sale for $80, or even less.\n \n \n \n Read our Google Nest Hub review.'<br><br><b>Author:David Carnoy</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/news/best-back-to-school-gear-under-100-for-2020/</b>

Diwakar Mandal

UfnfSXMBmG3CfVRx8lx9

Gripping Unsolved Mysteries reboot on Netflix wants you to play detective

Gripping Unsolved Mysteries reboot on Netflix wants you to play detective

b'Unsolved Mysteries is back, with new episodes now streaming on Netflix. I watched a lot of TV in the 1970s, \'80s and \'90s. A LOT of TV. I even co-wrote two books highlighting the shows and trends of those decades. And I have to say, most of the shows that ate up my time back then are best left to memory. For every awesome show like Mystery Science Theater 3000, there were a lot more that were like Manimal. That\'s why I was wary of\xc2\xa0Netflix\'s reboot of true-crime show Unsolved Mysteries, which I loved back in the day. Sometimes fond TV memories are best left in the past, you know? I for one did NOT need a Melrose Place remake with Ashlee Simpson, not that anyone asked me. But I\'m here to say the Unsolved Mysteries reboot sucked me in from the first minute. While I hesitate to say it\'s better than the Robert Stack original, it\'s that rare remake that uses all the improvements made in television since its first run to evolve into a fresh, modern and fascinating version of its old self. The interviews are longer and more in-depth. The re-enactments are judiciously used and aren\'t cheesy. The cases are well-chosen and get plenty of time. If you found yourself sucked into the podcast Serial, you\'ve found your summer TV obsession. The original Unsolved Mysteries ran from 1988-1999 on various networks, and was brought back twice in the 2000s. Actors (including, once, a young Matthew McConaughey) reenacted cold cases and urged viewers with any knowledge to help solve the mysteries. The original version also threw in the occasional freaky UFO or ghost story, maybe just to remind you you weren\'t watching PBS. As a kid, sitting in my parents\' Minnesota farmhouse, I was fascinated. The first six episodes of the current Unsolved Mysteries reboot became available July 1, with six more to come. The new show is being overseen by executive producer Shawn Levy of Stranger Things fame, in association with the original production company for Unsolved Mysteries, Cosgrove-Meurer Productions. Producers Terry Dunn Meurer and John Cosgrove, who created the show, are involved with the new reboot, and their 1980s baby is in good hands. There\'s no host, and that\'s just fine -- the late, great Robert Stack\'s powerful and unmistakable voice could never be imitated. Instead, the show is presented like mini documentaries on each case, focusing on only one case per episode, not three like the old show did. That gives the creators plenty of time to dig in to each cold case, and damn if they haven\'t found some mind-blowing ones. (Some spoilers ahead.) In the first episode, a likable guy named Rey Rivera vanishes from his Baltimore-area home in 2006, and is eventually found dead in an unused part of a local hotel. But his injuries are odd, his cell phone is unbroken and it seems unlikely a suicidal jump could have landed him in the spot where his body was found. Then there\'s the bizarre note found taped to his computer, which his wife insists isn\'t a suicide note, though it certainly seems to show a rambling thought process, and maybe a man not in his right mind. And then there\'s his mysterious best friend and employer, who won\'t talk to the police. All the ingredients for a tantalizing cold case. 2 Days. "Mystery on the Rooftop" is the story of a beloved Baltimore man, his suspicious death, and a family searching for answers. What happened to Rey Rivera? #unsolvedmysteries #suspicious pic.twitter.com/1wXpyMWsm7 The other cases are consistently intriguing too. Hairdresser Patrice Endres disappeared from her salon in 2004, and her body was found nearly two years later. Alonzo Brooks was last seen at a party in rural Kansas, also in 2004, and his body was found nearby a month later. Young mother Lena Chapin went missing in 2006, shortly after she implicated her own mom in the murder of the mom\'s ex-husband. In Unsolved Mysteries, families are not always like the Waltons. "No Ride Home" and completely alone, a young Black man goes missing in rural Kansas. What happened to Alonzo Brooks the night of April 3, 2004? The FBI recently announced a $100k reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction of Alonzo\'s death. #unsolvedmysteries pic.twitter.com/FUMVn1Qt0Y The show even goes international. For an episode that\'s almost entirely in French with English subtitles, a noble family is murdered, apparently by a father who won\'t fess up to money issues, and seems to have either killed himself or gone on the lam. "House of Terror" was how media outlets described the events uncovered at 55 Shuman Boulevard. How could the home of a noble-French family turn so horrific? #unsolvedmysteries #murdermystery pic.twitter.com/c0J2bqOehN Only episode 5 felt out of place. Like Unsolved Mysteries occasionally did in the old days, this episode wanders into the world of aliens and the paranormal,\xc2\xa0focusing on a 1969 UFO. It\'s the oldest case in the new batch, and definitely the least consequential. I made myself watch the entire episode to be fair to the show, but by the end, I still didn\'t care about what may or may not have happened in Massachusetts 50 years ago. But I should expect more off-the-wall episodes -- executive producer Terry Dunn Meurer told Variety a ghost story is among the upcoming shows. \xe2\x80\x9cBerkshires UFO\xe2\x80\x9d made a quiet Massachusetts town question the existence of extraterrestrial life. What events unfolded on that September night in 1969? #unsolvedmysteries #ufos pic.twitter.com/X9wvtS4cwx One of the best things about the return of Unsolved Mysteries in this era of social media is the fact that the investigation doesn\'t end when the episodes do. Netflix has put materials relating to each case on a public drive. The drive includes photos of the evidence, unseen video snippets, interviews and more. Now you can look at that bizarre note Rey Rivera left taped to his computer, or check out a closeup of Patrice Endres\' missing wedding ring. I\'m hoping Netflix adds more to this, because even though there are numerous clips for each case, nothing I saw there was earth-shattering -- guess if it was, they\'d have included it in the episode. And one of the best things about the new show is that if a case sparks your interest, social media gives you an easy way to dig deep and learn more, as well as keep up on any new discoveries. There\'s long been a subreddit about Unsolved Mysteries, and the new episodes are being discussed in detail there now. If Facebook is more your thing, there are numerous Facebook groups discussing the rebooted show and its individual cases, as well as other unsolved mysteries from around the world. Each case demands answers. You can help. Join the Netflix Unsolved Mysteries Facebook Groups to discuss the case and theories with fellow armchair detectives: https://t.co/bUYLSOToBM #UnsolvedMysteries Producer Terry Dunn Meurer told USA Today\xc2\xa0viewers started sending in tips on the various cases within 24 hours of Netflix premiering the new show, specifically about the Brooks, Rivera and Chapin cases. Brooks\' case was even reopened by police in June, Dunn Meurer told Variety. And Redditors have come up with a variety of theories about the\xc2\xa0 murdered French family, a truly haunting episode that put me in mind of 1971\'s infamous family killer John List, who was eventually caught thanks to another TV show, America\'s Most Wanted. Kudos, too, to the show for paying homage to its past in a classy way that doesn\'t feel like a desperate nostalgia grab. A photo of longtime host Robert Stack, who died in 2003, floats like a benevolent ghost through the opening credits, and the memorable and spine-chilling theme music is updated but still recognizable. Like many, I fell headlong down the Tiger King rabbit hole in April, when a quarantined world discovered Joe Exotic and his menagerie of messed-up pals. And like Tiger King, Unsolved Mysteries instantly soared to the top of Netflix\'s most-watched list upon release. Unsolved Mysteries is another perfect show for those of us spending most of our time at home due to the coronavirus outbreak. Businesses in my region may still be closed, jobs and stocks may be uncertain, but leave it to Netflix to remind us that somebody out there always has it worse -- with the added benefit that ordinary viewers might be able to turn detective and help a grieving family get justice. I still don\'t know about that UFO episode, but E.T., if you\'re watching, phone home and explain what your 1960s cousins were up to. The remaining six Unsolved Mysteries episodes will premiere on Netflix later in 2020.'<br><br><b>Author:Gael Fashingbauer Cooper</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/news/gripping-unsolved-mysteries-reboot-on-netflix-wants-you-to-play-detective/</b>

Nishu Kumari

Gi7XSXMBFOekF3BljoGW

HDFC Bank probes lending practices at vehicle-financing operation

HDFC Bank probes lending practices at vehicle-financing operation

HDFC Bank has conducted a probe into allegations of improper lending practices and conflicts of interests in its vehicle-financing operation involving the unit’s former head, according to people familiar with the matter.The bank decided against proceeding with an earlier proposal to extend the employment of Ashok Khanna, an 18-year veteran at the bank, after the investigation was completed, said the people, who asked not to be identified as the information remains confidential. The vehicle financing unit he headed had outstanding loans of more than Rs 1.2 trillion ($16 billion) as of March 31.<br><br><br><br> <br>HDFC Bank’s management had been discussing a proposal for Khanna to stay on as the unit’s head for six months until October. Khanna retired at the end of March in line with his contract, they added. <br>The result of the investigation isn’t public, but it followed issues thrown up by an internal audit of the bank’s vehicle-dealer lending, as well as allegations of conflicts of interest in the purchase of global positioning systems for vehicles financed by the bank, the people said, without disclosing what the probe uncovered.<br>HDFC Bank fell 2.3 per cent on Monday and its parent Housing Development Finance fell 2.1 per cent, among the three worst performers on the Sensex that gained 0.3 per cent. <br>A spokesman for HDFC Bank confirmed there had been an investigation into the vehicle-financing unit but declined to give details. In an emailed statement, he said Khanna had retired in March in line with the terms of his employment contract. <br>“The bank has a well-established process of investigating every complaint that it receives and takes actions as appropriate,” the spokesman said in the email. <br>“In the said instance as well, the bank has followed the due process.” Khanna declined to comment on the investigation, referring questions on the subject to the bank.HDFC Bank’s management had been discussing a proposal for Khanna to stay on as the unit’s head for six months until October. Khanna retired at the end of March in line with his contract, they added.The result of the investigation isn’t public, but it followed issues thrown up by an internal audit of the bank’s vehicle-dealer lending, as well as allegations of conflicts of interest in the purchase of global positioning systems for vehicles financed by the bank, the people said, without disclosing what the probe uncovered.HDFC Bank fell 2.3 per cent on Monday and its parent Housing Development Finance fell 2.1 per cent, among the three worst performers on the Sensex that gained 0.3 per cent.A spokesman for HDFC Bank confirmed there had been an investigation into the vehicle-financing unit but declined to give details. In an emailed statement, he said Khanna had retired in March in line with the terms of his employment contract.“The bank has a well-established process of investigating every complaint that it receives and takes actions as appropriate,” the spokesman said in the email.“In the said instance as well, the bank has followed the due process.” Khanna declined to comment on the investigation, referring questions on the subject to the bank.<br><br><b>Author:Suvashree Ghosh & Anto Antony | Bloomberg <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> |  <br><p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> <p><p><p><p><p><p><p><p> New Delhi</b><br><b>Source:https://www.business-standard.com/article/finance/hdfc-bank-probes-lending-practices-at-vehicle-financing-operation-120071400066_1.html</b>

Parmeshwar Murmu

Qi7fSXMBFOekF3Bl84Fn

Los Angeles, San Diego schools will continue online learning in the fall

Los Angeles, San Diego schools will continue online learning in the fall

b'Los Angeles and San Diego school districts will continue to online-only learning in the fall. Los Angeles and San Diego, California\'s two largest school districts, revealed that students will continue to learn online only in the fall. School Superintendent in Los Angeles, Austin Beutner said in a tweet on Monday that the continuous rise in coronavirus cases risk the health and safety of students and teachers. "Unfortunately, COVID-19 continues to spread in the Los Angeles area, and the virus is going to impact how we start the new school year," said Beutner. "The health and safety of all in the school community is not something we can compromise." Update on July 13thActualizaci\xc3\xb3n del 13 de julio pic.twitter.com/HhbvV6zYfu Los Angeles and San Diego unified school districts said they will provide expanded online education training for teachers and students. The districts will also offer more online support options for parents with the aim to make it easier for them to participate in their child\'s learning. Over the course of the pandemic, Los Angeles and San Diego unified school districts have provided 47 million free meals and 250,000 computers to students in need. Both districts plan on continuing to provide meals to families in the fall. Keep track of the coronavirus pandemic. The school year will start on Aug. 18 in Los Angeles and Aug. 31 in San Diego. Both districts plan to return to in-person learning during the 2020-21 academic year when public health conditions allow. California rolled back reopening efforts on Monday due to a surge in cases. As of Monday, there are more than 3.3 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the US and more than 135,000 people have died, according to John Hopkins University. The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.'<br><br><b>Author:Alexandra Garrett</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/health/los-angeles-san-diego-schools-will-continue-online-learning-in-the-fall/</b>

Natasha Dixit

XrrfSXMB_V_LWfVU9OCc

Get paid $1,000 to sink your teeth into Shark Week

Get paid $1,000 to sink your teeth into Shark Week

b"He kind of looks like he's smiling. Shark Week 2020 kicks off next month on Discovery Channel, and you could earn $1,000 to watch all of it. US Direct, an authorized DIRECTV dealer, is taking applications for Shark Week enthusiasts\xc2\xa0to binge every shark-related show on the network through July 27. If you're chosen, you'll be paid to watch every minute of Shark Week content starting Aug. 9. You'll also be tasked with tweeting and sharing your favorite shark fact of the day with the hashtag #SharkWeekDreamJawb. Each program must also be ranked from least to best in the following categories: most entertaining, most informative, most fearsome and most surprising. The company will also set up the winner with free Shark Week content, snacks and other shark gear like t-shirts and socks. To be selected, US Direct asks that you be at least 18 years old, a US resident and a huge shark fan, of course."<br><br><b>Author:Shelby Brown</b><br><b>Source:https://cnet.com/news/watching-shark-week-could-earn-you-1000/</b>

Parth Bhatnagar

9LrMSXMB_V_LWfVUgt8T

Apple may soon become world's first $2 trillion-valued company

Apple may soon become world's first $2 trillion-valued company

Apple Inc could soon achieve a market valuation of $2 trillion, becoming the world’s first company to do so, buoyed by its services business and a multi-year 5G market opportunity, says Wall Street technology sector analyst Daniel Ives<br>, who set a new bull case price target of $525 on the iPhone maker’s shares.<br><br>Shares of Apple touched a <br>new record high of $399.73<br> in intraday trading on the Nasdaq on Monday, with the company’s market valuation crossing $1.7 trillion for the first time ever.<br><br><br>Technology sector analysts, including Daniel, lifted their price target on the stock on optimism around the expected launch of its 5G-enabled iPhone 12 later this year. <br><br>“The stage is setting up for a massive pent-up iPhone 12 cycle heading into the fall in this key region (China) as well as globally,” says <br>Daniel Ives, Managing Director, Equity Research, Wedbush Securities. <br><br><br>Daniel raised his target on Apple shares by nearly 13 percent to $450, suggesting a 17 percent upside potential to the stock’s Friday, July 10 close of $383.68. His bull-case target of $525 implies Apple shares have the potential to surge nearly 37 percent from its Friday, July 10 close, suggesting market valuation could soar well past $2 trillion.<br><br><br><b>“Our recent Asia checks and supply chain contacts are giving us increasing confidence in the iPhone 12 growth story with strong underlying momentum into CY21 on the heels of iPhone 12 which remains the linchpin to our "5G super cycle thesis" on Apple,” he adds.</b><br><br>5G is expected to be a key ingredient in Apple's next chapter of growth and will be a major factor driving the expected boost in its market valuation to $2 trillion by 2021, adds the Wall Street tech analyst.<br><br><br>Apple's India market <br><br>The India market too could play a significant role in how quickly Apple reaches the $2 trillion market capitalisation mark, Daniel tells YourStory.<br><br><br>“We are seeing a change in India and with more consumers not buying Chinese smartphones, we see Apple gaining major share in the market over the coming year," the analyst says.<br><br><br>In late June, the <br>India government banned as many as 59 Chinese apps<br>, including popular ones such as WeChat, Helo, and TikTok, terming their usage ‘prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, the security of the state, and public order.’<br><br><br>"India has been a tough nut to crack for Apple, and any incremental success here would be a huge feather in the cap towards reaching the $2 trillion mark,” Daniel tells YourStory.<br><br><br>Demand for 5G-enabled iPhone 12<br><br>In mid-to-late September, Apple is expected to launch four models for iPhone 12, with a mix of 4G/5G, at price points that could potentially be lower than $1,000 on some versions despite the additional 5G component, according to Daniel. <br><br><br>“The supply chain getting back to normalisation ahead of expectations has been impressive and now ultimately puts Cook & Co. back in the driver’s seat to launch this 5G cycle in its typical mid-late September timeframe with the smartphones hitting the shelves/ website by early October,” says Daniel.<br><br>The veteran tech analyst adds that his supply chain checks indicate that no wired EarPods and chargers will be included in the iPhone 12 box, which in turn could create more cross-selling opportunities for AirPods over the coming year. <br><br><br>He estimates Apple is on “an eye-popping trajectory” to sell around 90 million AirPod units, up significantly from 65 million in 2019.<br><br><br>Apple shares have already surged around 34 percent since the start of this year, on the back of optimism surrounding its new generation 5G iPhones as well as strong momentum in its services business, which includes the App store, the recently launched Apple TV+, Apple Music, and Apple Pay.<br><br><br>Daniel assumes the services business will have a $600 billion to $650 billion valuation range, citing “…the increasing importance of this key revenue stream that is getting a new appreciation by investors during this COVID-19 pandemic, as Cook & Co. continue to flawlessly execute on the vision.”<br><br>Apple is due to announce its quarterly earnings for its fiscal third quarter on July 30. <br><br><br><b>Author:Tenzin Pema</b><br><b>Source:https://www.yourstory.com/2020/07/apple-worlds-first-two-trillion-market-valuation-wedbush-daniel-ives</b>

Tanvi Gokhale

xLqdSXMB_V_LWfVUC96R

Researchers says autoclaving, alcohol not the best options for disinfecting, reusing face masks

Researchers says autoclaving, alcohol not the best options for disinfecting, reusing face masks

A University of Cincinnati researcher is advising against using two widely available sterilization methods to clean disposable surgical masks and N95 respirators for reuse in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Scarcity of personal protection equipment in medical settings has led many health systems to consider sterilizing and reusing masks developed initially as disposable items, says Sergey Grinshpun, Ph.D., director of the University of Cincinnati Center for Health-Related Aerosol Studies and professor in the UC Department of Environmental and Public Health Sciences.<br>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has allowed reuse of N95 facepiece respirators as a crisis capacity strategy.<br>Grinshpun tested two brands of N95 respirators along with two types of surgical masks—one with high filtration and one with low-filtration abilities—using an autoclave, an apparatus that works similar to a pressure cooker to sterilize items by using steam, heat and pressure during a specific time frame.<br>"The question for us was, what will happen with the performance of these N95 respirators and the surgical masks after they have spent minutes or longer in the autoclave and to what extent will the heat or steam destroy the structure of the filter making the items less useful," says Grinshpun.<br>Grinshpun also used another decontamination method which employed soaking the respirators and surgical masks in a 70% ethanol treatment for two hours and then drying the devices before their reuse. Alcohol is readily available in hospital settings and utilized for instrument sterilization.<br>Tests were conducted with disinfection treatments applied up to five times to simulate reusage that might occur in a healthcare setting.<br>"It almost didn't matter how often we decontaminated the protective devices— once, twice or five times—since the major damage inflicted on the performance characteristics of the items followed the first test," explains Grinshpun. "You are going to lose in performance if these masks or respirators are sterilized using either of these treatments. Of course, quantitatively, the effect differs for different devices."<br>The findings of the study are available online in the Journal of Hospital Infection. Co-authors of the study include Michael Yermakov, MD, senior research associate in the UC Department of Environmental and Public Health Sciences, and Marat Khodoun, Ph.D., research associate professor in the UC Department of Internal Medicine.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>The study found that neither sterilization in an autoclave nor alcohol treatment caused visible damages to the surgical masks. The 3M 8210 N95 respirator revealed physical damages after implementing a single autoclave disinfection such as partial disintegration of the soft sealing material around the nose clip, and, importantly, loss of strap elasticity, which made this respiratory protective device not reusable.<br>Meanwhile, testing of the remaining 3M 1870 N95 respirator produced notable, but moderate damage and some detachment along with a minor deformation of the nose foam after a single and multiple autoclaving.<br>Experimental design of the study included testing each protective device by mounting it on a frame designed to utilize the entire effective filtration area. An air flow rate through the system was chosen to mimic breathing of a health care worker under a moderate and a strenuous workload. To simulate contamination of the test protective devices the items were soiled with protein.<br>"When multiple sterilizations were applied, facepieces were soiled before each autoclave treatment to mimic the device usage in air environments contaminated with protein that may be associated with emission of pathogenic virions by infected persons," according to the study. Researchers chose to perform five soil and sterilization cycles to simulate a daily reuse of the filtering facepiece over a period of five days.<br>Grinshpun also says that N95 respirators and some surgical masks rely on fibers that have an electrostatic charge which allows them to capture small particles and protect the wearer. Autoclaving and alcohol treatment weaken this electrostatic charge.<br>"What happens when you subject something to alcohol, heat or steam?" asks Grinshpun. "These fibers will lose, maybe not entirely, but at least some of their electric charge. This has a detrimental effect on the filter performance so that these protective devices may not be able to capture aerosol participles, including coronaviruses, as efficiently anymore."<br>For some N95 respirators their collection efficiency can drop below their certification level of 95% for the most penetrating particle sizes, says Grinshpun.<br>He adds that performance of surgical masks changes as a result of autoclaving, whether the mask is soiled or not, with the effect being more pronounced for devices which had poor initial filtration capabilities.<br>He says instead of using autoclaving or ethanol alcohol to disinfect face masks and N95 respirator facepieces, alternative options such as ultraviolet light may be explored. Grinshpun's study did not look at UV primarily because the investigators intended first to examine methods that are readily available in hospitals.<br>"We anticipated that UV-based and probably other techniques may be almost as efficient as autoclaving and ethanol treatment in inactivating pathogens but at the same time would not damage the fibers of protective detectives so that the particle collection efficiency will not suffer," says Grinshpun. "Similar studies can and should be conducted with alternative decontamination methods."<br>"The question of how the disinfection treatments impact the performance and integrity of respiratory protective devices remains important for as long as healthcare workers have to reuse these devices due to their shortage of personal protective equipment," says Grinshpun.<br> <br><br><b>Author:University of Cincinnati</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-autoclaving-alcohol-options-disinfecting-reusing.html</b>

Rahul Kumar Yadav

wrqdSXMB_V_LWfVUC94F

Spanish showdown as court suspends local lockdown order

Spanish showdown as court suspends local lockdown order

Catalan government officials mulled action Monday after a local court blocked a lockdown order confining 160,000 people to homes in a virus-hit area of northeastern Spain.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Faced with a rapidly rising number of infections in Segria, around 150 kilometres (90 miles) west of Barcelona, the Catalan government on Sunday issued a stay-at-home order in and around the city of Lerida.<br>It was the first such order since Spain's state of emergency ended on June 21. <br>The area, home to more than 200,000 people, had already been subjected to restrictions on July 4 after cases started to rise, but it didn't help and on Sunday, Catalan officials ordered the confinement of 160,000 residents.<br>Within hours, the order was overturned by a judge who ruled it "contrary to law", saying such restrictions can only be imposed by the central government.<br>Although the decision can be appealed, it triggered a showdown with regional authorities as Catalan president Quim Torra said he would "not accept" it.<br>"We are looking at how we can resolve this matter legally," Catalan health minister Alba Verges told Catalonia Radio. <br>"These are necessary measures.. we would not have taken them if they weren't absolutely necessary," she said, while urging people to stay at home. <br>Despite calls to respect the closure, many people were on the streets Monday, with shops and bars still open, an AFP correspondent said. <br>But many were confused and worried. <br>"One says this, the other says that, and the city itself doesn't know what it's supposed to be doing," said Eugene Badila, a 41-year-old salesman. <br>Since the start of the pandemic, the Segria area has counted 3,180 cases and 137 deaths. <br>Officials have linked the latest outbreaks to movement of seasonal agricultural workers who travel around Spain to harvest fruit and vegetables. <br>More than 70 coronavirus clusters have now been identified in Spain, with officials most worried by the outbreak in the Lerida area.<br>Other clusters have been identified in Galicia in the north west, and in the northern Basque country region—both of which on Sunday held their first regional elections since the onset of the pandemic.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-spanish-showdown-court-local-lockdown.html</b>

MD KASHIF REZA

wbqdSXMB_V_LWfVUCt70

WHO says no return to 'normal' as Latin America deaths pass US

WHO says no return to 'normal' as Latin America deaths pass US

Too many nations are mismanaging their coronavirus response, placing a return to normality a long way off, the World Health Organization warned Monday as Latin America recorded the world's second-highest death toll.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> With new infections spreading like wildfire, many countries were reimposing restrictions on Monday, locking down towns and cities and reintroducing measures to halt the spread of the sickness.<br>But WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that too many countries were "headed in the wrong direction" with governments giving out mixed messages that were undermining trust. <br>"There will be no return to the 'old normal' for the foreseeable future," he said, warning that without governments adopting a comprehensive strategy, the situation would get "worse and worse and worse".<br>Since the start of July, nearly 2.5 million new infections have been detected across the globe, with the number of cases doubling over the past six weeks, according to an AFP tally based on official figures.<br>In Spain, regional officials were in a standoff with courts after a judge suspended a lockdown just hours after it was imposed on 160,000 people in the Catalonia city of Lerida following a sharp rise in cases. <br>Despite calls to respect the closure, many people were on the streets by mid-afternoon, with shops and bars still open, an AFP correspondent said. <br>It was the first such order given since Spain's lockdown ended on June 21 and the situation in the northeastern city was the most worrying among 120 outbreaks across a country where the virus has killed more than 28,400 people.<br>Reimposing lockdowns<br>South Africa has also reimposed a nationwide curfew to prevent a "coronavirus storm" from ravaging the continent's hardest-hit nation, where new infections have topped 12,000 per day. <br><br><br><br><br><br> The man in the presidential mask: Donald Trump wore a face mask for the first time in public<br> <br><br><br>Morocco followed suit on Monday, locking down Tangiers, with public transport suspended, cafes and public spaces closed and movement restricted in the northern port city of a million inhabitants.<br>In Asia, the Philippines imposed a two-week lockdown on 250,000 people in the capital Manila as new infections soared, and Hong Kong stepped up precautions to combat a sudden spike in infections.<br>Restaurants there can only serve takeaway food after 6 pm, gyms, nightclubs, karaoke bars and beauty salons were shuttered and public gatherings were restricted to four people. <br><br><br><br><br><br><br>And two US Marine bases on Japan's Okinawa island have been locked down after a spike in cases with dozens infected and local officials expressing "serious doubts" about the US military's containment efforts. <br>Across the globe, the pandemic has infected nearly 13 million people, killed more than 566,000 and triggered massive economic damage in the seven months since it was detected in the Chinese city of Wuhan.<br>With cases surging in Latin America, the region on Monday declared a total of 144,758 deaths, passing the 144,023 recorded in the United States and Canada.<br>It now stands second only to Europe, where 202,505 people have died.<br>At the weekend, US President Donald Trump wore a face mask in public for the first time, in the world's worst-hit country where 135,171 people have died.<br>Mexico has become the country with the fourth-highest number of COVID-19 fatalities in the world, climbing to a total of 35,006 deaths and surpassing Italy.<br>And Iran, the worst-hit country in the Middle East, counted more than 200 new deaths on Monday, pushing its toll over 13,000.<br>The latest high-profile personality to test positive for COVID-19 was Bollywood superstar and former Miss World Aishwarya Rai.<br><br><br><br><br><br> The countries with the largest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the past week<br> <br><br><br>Millionaires' initiative: 'Tax us more'<br>With eyes keenly focused on the economic fallout, the IMF warned Monday that the Middle East and North Africa region was facing its worst downturn in 50 years, citing the "twin shock" of the virus and low oil prices. <br>The region's economy will contract by 5.7 percent this year and by up to 13 percent in conflict-hit nations, it said, warning of soaring poverty and unemployment, social unrest and spiralling debt. <br>Meanwhile more than 80 millionaires on Monday urged governments around the world to hike taxes on the super-wealthy to help fund the recovery. <br>In an open letter, "Millionaires for Humanity" said they should be taxed higher, "immediately, substantially, permanently". <br>"No, we are not the ones caring for the sick in intensive care wards, we are not driving the ambulances," wrote the signatories, among them Ben and Jerry's ice cream co-founder Jerry Greenfield and screenwriter Richard Curtis.<br>"But we do have money, lots of it. Money that is desperately needed now and will continue to be needed in the years ahead, as our world recovers from this crisis."<br>Scientists have urged people take social distancing more seriously, with a French expert warning that a fully effective vaccine was highly unlikely by 2021. <br>And in what may prove a blow to those who have recovered, researchers at Kings College London said COVID-19 survivors could lose their immunity, leaving them vulnerable to reinfection within months.<br> <br><br><b>Author:Robin Millard With Hazel Ward In Madrid and Afp Bureaus</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-latin-america-deaths.html</b>

Supriyo Pandit

wLqdSXMB_V_LWfVUCt5Q

UK textiles under scrutiny over sweatshop claims

UK textiles under scrutiny over sweatshop claims

Interior minister Priti Patel on Monday condemned a "modern-day scourge" in the UK textile sector, after reports that thousands of people were working in modern slavery.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> The textile sector has come under scrutiny, particularly in Leicester, central England, after a coronavirus flare-up that forced the city into lockdown two weeks ago.<br>Factories that continued to operate at full capacity at the height of the outbreak were blamed for the surge in cases, although public health bodies said no single source was responsible.<br>But the spotlight on the city threw up fresh questions about unscrupulous practices and exploitation of garment factory workers, including low wages and poor conditions.<br>In parliament, Patel was urged to do more to eradicate the "clear evidence of modern slavery in plain sight" at garment factories.<br>She said she "completely agreed" with the description of them as "a modern-day scourge when it comes to exploitation", and called for better enforcement of existing legislation.<br>Campaigners have in recent weeks highlighted pressures on workers to stay on the job at textile factories in Leicester despite the outbreak, and wages well below the national minimum of £8.72 an hour.<br>Andrew Bridgen, from Prime Minister Boris Johnson's ruling Conservative party, estimated that the city's garment factories could count up to 10,000 victims of modern slavery.<br>The MP, whose constituency is five miles (eight kilometres) from Leicester, said he had been told wages could be as low as £2.00 ($2.50, 2.20 euros) per hour.<br>Those affected were a "mixture of local people and immigrant workers", and some were in the country illegally, making them ripe for exploitation, he told AFP, citing whistleblowers.<br>Patel's department, the Home Office, said it took allegations of modern slavery "extremely seriously" and was determined to bring the people responsible to book.<br>"The National Crime Agency and others are looking into the appalling allegations about sweatshops in Leicester and the home secretary has been clear that anyone profiting from slave labour will have nowhere to hide," a spokesman said.<br>Anti-Slavery, a pressure group, said more than 10,000 people were referred to the UK authorities last year as victims of modern slavery but the real number was likely to be higher.<br>Leicester, which has one of the country's most diverse populations, is thought to be home to at least 1,000 garment factories, supplying many leading clothing brands.<br>Shares in one of them, clothing group Boohoo, slumped last week on the back of allegations about exploitation, and has launched a review of its UK supply chain.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-uk-textiles-scrutiny-sweatshop.html</b>

Abhay kumar Dubey

xfmdSXMBmG3CfVRxClpD

WHO says countries taking 'wrong direction' on virus

WHO says countries taking 'wrong direction' on virus

The World Health Organization warned Monday that too many countries were bungling their response to the coronavirus pandemic, meaning there could be no return to normality any time soon.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> After a daily record of 230,000 new COVID-19 cases reported on Sunday, the UN health agency said the pandemic was only going to get worse unless people stuck to the basics of physical distancing, handwashing, wearing masks and staying home if sick.<br>WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that some countries easing their way out of lockdowns were now witnessing a resurgence of the virus because they were not following proven methods to reduce risks.<br>"I want to be straight with you: there will be no return to the 'old normal' for the foreseeable future," Tedros told a virtual news briefing.<br>"Let me blunt: too many countries are headed in the wrong direction.<br>"The virus remains public enemy number one, but the actions of many governments and people do not reflect this."<br>He said mixed messages from leaders were undermining trust.<br>If governments do not roll out a comprehensive strategy to suppress transmission of the virus, and if the public do not follow the basics, "there is only one way this pandemic is going to go," Tedros said.<br>"It's going to get worse and worse and worse."<br>'Explosive transmission'<br>The novel coronavirus has killed nearly 570,000 people and infected more than 12.9 million since the outbreak emerged in Wuhan in China last December, according to a tally from official sources compiled by AFP.<br>Tedros said four scenarios were now playing out around the world.<br>They were: Countries that were alert and avoided large outbreaks, those that got a major outbreak under control, those that eased restrictions but are now backsliding, and those in an intense transmission phase.<br>Tedros said the heart of the crisis remains the Americas—accounting for more than half of infections—but stressed it was never too late to bring "explosive transmission" under control.<br>In a study released on Monday—the first of its kind—a team led by researchers from King's College London said patients who recover from coronavirus infections might lose immunity to reinfection within months.<br>WHO emergencies director Michael Ryan said it was not yet known whether recovered COVID-19 patients could be infected again, but "with other coronaviruses, that is the case".<br>WHO COVID-19 technical lead Maria Van Kerkhove said more studies were needed.<br>While those infected did mount some level of immune response through antibodies, "what we don't know is how strong that protection is, and for how long that protection will last", she said.<br>China mission<br>The WHO has sent a two-person mission to China to lay the groundwork for a study into the animal origins of the new coronavirus.<br>The epidemiologist and animal health expert have gone into quarantine after arriving at the weekend, as per Chinese regulations, but are already working.<br>Ryan said it was assumed the virus came from a bat, but the intermediate animal host that transmitted it between bats and humans was not yet established.<br>In Beijing, Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a press briefing that experts from China and the WHO would "enter into scientific cooperation on tracing the origins of the novel coronavirus".<br>"The WHO also believes that finding the origin is a constantly developing process that could involve multiple countries and regions," Hua insisted.<br>Ryan said the probe "should start at where the first clusters of human cases were detected—and that's Wuhan in China.<br>"You need to go to the epicentre and work from there."<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-countries-wrong-virus.html</b>

Mayank Singh

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WHO says no return to normality for 'foreseeable future'

WHO says no return to normality for 'foreseeable future'

The World Health Organization warned Monday that there could be no return to normality any time soon as too many countries were bungling their response to the coronavirus pandemic.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> After a daily record of 230,000 new cases of COVID-19 were reported to the WHO on Sunday, the UN health agency said the pandemic was only going to get worse unless people stuck to the basics of physical distancing, handwashing and wearing masks.<br>WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that countries that were easing their way out of lockdowns were now witnessing a resurgence of the virus because they were not following proven methods to reduce risk.<br>"I want to be straight with you: there will be no return to the 'old normal' for the foreseeable future," Tedros told a virtual news briefing.<br>"Let me blunt: too many countries are headed in the wrong direction.<br>"The virus remains public enemy number one, but the actions of many governments and people do not reflect this."<br>He said mixed messages from leaders were undermining trust.<br>If governments do not roll out a comprehensive strategy to suppress transmission of the virus, and if populations do not follow basic public health principles, "there is only one way this pandemic is going to go," he said.<br>"It's going to get worse and worse and worse."<br>The novel coronavirus has killed nearly 570,000 people and infected more than 12.9 million since the outbreak emerged in China last December, according to a tally from official sources compiled by AFP.<br>"Although the number of daily deaths remains relatively stable, there is a lot to be concerned about," said Tedros.<br>He said there were four scenarios playing out around the world.<br>They were: countries that were alert and avoided large outbreaks, those that got a major outbreak under control, those that eased restrictions but are now backsliding, and those that are in an intense transmission phase.<br>Tedros said the epicentre of the virus remains the Americas.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-future.html</b>

AJAY KUMAR MAHATO

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Hong Kong reimposes social distancing as virus cases spike

Hong Kong reimposes social distancing as virus cases spike

Hong Kong reimposed social distancing measures on Monday to combat a sudden spike in coronavirus infections, banning more than four people from gathering in public and requiring passengers to wear face masks on public transport or risk a US$650 fine.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> Some businesses will also be closed and restaurants restricted over when they can serve diners.<br>The finance hub was one of the first places to be struck by the coronavirus when it emerged from central China.<br>The city has had impressive success in tackling the disease with just over 1,400 infections and eight deaths. In the last two months, local transmissions had all but ended.<br>However, in the last two weeks a cluster of 180 local infections has emerged and officials believe the disease is spreading undetected in the densely populated city of 7.5 million.<br>On Monday, city leader Carrie Lam announced fresh anti-virus measures. <br>Alongside a ban on more than four people gathering in public, restaurants will only be able to serve takeaway food from 6:00 pm to 5:00 am, however they can still serve those eating in for breakfast and lunch.<br>Twelve types of businesses including bars, pubs, gyms, beauty salons, nightclubs and karaoke venues must close.<br>Hong Kongers have widely adopted face masks to deal with the pandemic but on Monday authorities made wearing face coverings on public transport mandatory for the first time.<br>Those who refuse to wear masks face a HK$5,000 ($650) fine. <br>"This is a time for tightening," Lam told reporters, adding the measures would be reviewed every seven days.<br>The announcement is a new body blow to the city's economy, which was already mired in recession before the pandemic hit.<br>Last year Hong Kong was battered by both the increasingly aggressive US-China trade war and seven straight months of huge and often violent pro-democracy protests.<br>Health secretary Sophia Chan said officials were trying to "strike a balance" between social distancing and keeping businesses open.<br>Earlier in the day officials announced a 95-year-old woman had died of coronavirus, the city's eighth victim.<br>Police also said a South Korean man who tested positive for the virus jumped out of a moving minibus as he was being taken to compulsory quarantine. <br>Police later detained the man.<br> <br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-hong-kong-reimposes-social-distancing.html</b>

Sawant Raj

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New therapy extends breast cancer survival rate, prevents reoccurrence

New therapy extends breast cancer survival rate, prevents reoccurrence

A new immunotherapy developed by researchers at Northwestern University dramatically extends the survival time of mice with triple negative breast cancer, one of the most aggressive and difficult-to-treat forms of breast cancer.<br> <br><br><br><br><br> In a new study, mice treated with the therapy, which comprises two immunity-boosting drugs housed inside a nanoparticle, experienced complete tumor remission for at least 100 days. All untreated mice died by day 30. None of the treated mice experienced adverse side effects or autoimmune responses.<br>The nanoparticle, called a spherical nucleic acid (SNA), is a globular form of DNA that can easily enter and stimulate immune cells. Northwestern's Chad A. Mirkin, who led the study and invented SNAs, credits the nanoparticle's shape and structure for the immunotherapy's success.<br>"We have demonstrated that the overall structural presentation of a cancer vaccine or immunotherapeutic—not simply the active chemical components—can dramatically impact its potency," Mirkin said. "This finding is opening doors in an emerging field we call 'rational vaccinology' and could lead to treatments for many different types of cancer."<br>The research will be published online during the week of July 13, 2020 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.<br>Mirkin is the George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry in Northwestern's Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, director of the International Institute of Nanotechnology and member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University.<br>How it works<br>Typical immunotherapies consist of a molecule or molecules from tumor cells (called antigens) paired with a molecule (called an adjuvant) that stimulates the immune system. More advanced forms consist of a cocktail of antigen molecules taken from a patient's cancer cells (called lysates). The lysate trains the immune system to recognize its target (the tumor), and the adjuvant boosts the body's immune response to destroy that target. Physicians mix the lysate and adjuvant together in a cellular culture and then inject the mixture into the patient.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br>Because the therapy is a structurally ill-defined mixture, Mirkin calls this the "blender approach." The lysate and adjuvant aren't packaged together, so it's difficult to ensure that they will hit the same target.<br>"Statistically, you will get some cells to take up both the lysate and the adjuvant," said Cassandra Callmann, a postdoctoral fellow in Mirkin's lab and the paper's first author. "But you also will get some cells that only receive one or the other. To maximize the immunotherapy's potency, you need to co-deliver both to the same target cells and in the most effective form or structure possible."<br>To overcome this challenge, Mirkin's team packaged the lysate and adjuvant together inside the core of an SNA. In the study, they injected the SNA underneath the skin of mice with triple-negative breast cancer. The SNAs traveled to the lymph nodes of the mice, entered the cells and released their cargo. This caused an immune response within the cells to combat the lysate.<br>Prolonging survival, preventing reoccurrence<br>After treating nine mice with triple-negative breast cancer, six experienced complete tumor remission for 100 days without obvious side effects. Although the other three mice never reached remission, the new treatment did suppress their tumor growth, and the mice still lived longer than the control group.<br>"It's definitely prolonging survival," Callmann noted. "Even if not all mice were completely cured."<br>Mirkin and his team also found that the SNA-based immunotherapy protected the mice from relapsing. After the mice entered remission, the team attempted to reimplant the mice with cancer, but tumors did not grow.<br>When Mirkin's team removed and examined the tumors from therapy-treated mice, the researchers found an increased number of cytotoxic T-cells—a type of immune cell that attacks disease—and a decreased number of immunosuppressant cells, which prevent the immune system from responding to fight disease.<br>"If the immunotherapy is protecting the mice from cancer reoccurring, then we may be able to use this is in a preventive context," said Mirkin, who is a member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. "Our study suggests that the therapy is providing an 'immune memory.' That's something we're looking into right now."<br>Interestingly, a stronger immune response occurred when the researchers incorporated oxidized tumor cells into the SNAs. When making the lysate, the researchers treated the tumor cells with hypochlorous acid, which oxidizes—and kills—the cells. Other researchers have noted in previous clinical studies that oxidized cells create more potent immunotherapies.<br>"We have confirmed that's true," Callmann said. "And we showed that the immune system gives an even better response if the oxidized lysate is also packaged in an SNA."<br>Exploring other cancers<br>Mirkin's team first tested the new therapy on triple-negative breast cancer tumors because the cancer is one of the most difficult to treat. According to the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation, this disease accounts for 15%-20% of all breast cancers. The cancer tests negative for three proteins (hence the name "triple negative") produced in large amounts by other types of breast cancer. It resists commonly used breast cancer drugs that target those three proteins.<br>"It's one of the most deadly and aggressive forms of breast cancer," Callmann said. "There are many different types of mutations, and some of the cells mutate very quickly. There is an immediate need for new treatments that work."<br>The researchers believe that, in theory, SNA-based immunotherapies should be an effective treatment for many types of cancer. Mirkin's team plans to explore that next. Mirkin notes that he feels encouraged that four SNA drugs are already in human clinical trials, including a variant of the SNA used in this study in a type of immunotherapy for Merkel Cell carcinoma. That structure also was invented at Northwestern and is in a Phase 2 clinical trial conducted by Exicure, a clinical stage biotechnology startup.<br> <br><br><b>Author:Northwestern University</b><br><b>Source:https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-07-therapy-breast-cancer-survival-reoccurrence.html</b>

RIA RATH

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